news

Activision's deal with YouTube is reportedly valued at $160m - almost doubling its prior deal with Twitch

Eurogamer - Sun, 16/02/2020 - 19:42

The "exclusive worldwide third-party provider" deal for livestreaming between YouTube and Activision Blizzard is reportedly worth $160 million (£122m).

Activision Blizzard announced the deal with YouTube a few weeks ago, saying the "multi-year strategic relationship to power new player experiences" would see Google Cloud serve as the "preferred provider for Activision Blizzard's game hosting infrastructure", and YouTube as its "exclusive streaming partner worldwide", excluding China.

The details of the deal weren't specified at the time, but by comparison, a similar deal Activision struck with Twitch in 2018 was thought to be worth around $90 million.

Read more

Categories: Video Games

Looks like the Sonic the Hedgehog movie might be one of the most successful video game movies of all time

Eurogamer - Sun, 16/02/2020 - 19:17

The Sonic the Hedgehog movie has generated over $100 million (£76.6m) on its opening weekend.

As reported by Comicbook, the success can be attributed to a number of fortuitous coincidences, not least the fact the movie debuted on Valentine's Day and benefited from a long-weekend as our friends Stateside celebrated Presidents' Day, during which it's thought to have clocked up $68m (£52m) at the box office.

The success can't just be attributed to that, though, as it's also thought to have generated $43m (£33m) worldwide, too. So we're all to blame, really.

Read more

Categories: Video Games

The Gig Workers For Target's Delivery App Hate Their Algorithmically-Determined Pay

Slashdot - Sun, 16/02/2020 - 18:34
In 2017 Target bought a same-day home-delivery company called Shipt for $550 million. Shipt now services half of Target's stores, reports Motherboard, and employs more than 100,000 gig workers. Unfortunately, they're working for a company that "has a track record of censoring and retaliating against workers for asking basic questions about their working conditions or expressing dissent," reports Motherboard. For example, an hour after tweeting about how there was now much more competition for assignments, one Seattle gig worker found their account suddenly "deactivated" — the equivalent of being fired — and also received an email saying they were no longer "eligible to reapply". "They stamp out resistance by flooding the market with new workers..." complained one Shipt worker, "and they're actively monitoring all the social media groups." On its official national Facebook group, known as the Shipt Shopper Lounge, which has more than 100,000 members, Shipt moderators selected by the company frequently censor and remove posts, turn off comments sections, and ban workers who speak out about their working conditions, according to screenshots, interviews, and other documentation provided to Motherboard. The same is true on local Facebook groups, which Shipt also monitors closely, according to workers. Motherboard spoke to seven current Shipt workers, each of whom described a culture of retaliation, fear, and censorship online... Because Shipt classifies its workers as contractors, not employees, workers pay for all of their expenses — including gas, wear and tear on their cars, and accidents — out of pocket. They say the tips on large orders from Target, sometimes with hundreds of items, can be meager. Workers say Shipt customers often live in gated and upscale communities and that the app encourages workers to tack on gifts like thank you cards, hot cocoa, flowers, and balloons onto orders (paid for out of their own pocket) and to offer to walk customer's dogs and take out their trash, as a courtesy. Shipt calls this kind of service "Bringing the Magic," which can improve workers' ratings from customers that factor into the algorithm that determines who gets offered the most lucrative orders... Unfortunately, that new algorithm (which began rolling out last year) is opaque to the workers affected by it — though Gizmodo reported pay appears to be at least 28% lower. And Motherboard heard even higher estimates: "Our best estimate is that payouts are now 30 percent less, and up to 50 percent on orders," one Shipt worker in Kalamazoo with two years under her belt, who wished to remain anonymous for fear of retaliation, told Motherboard. "I fluctuate between extreme anger and despair. It's been three weeks since this has been implemented, and one of my good friends told me that she's down the equivalent of a car payment." Another Shipt worker in Palm Springs, California provided Motherboard with receipts for a 181-item order that included six Snapple cases, five La Croix cases, and 12 packs of soda. They had to wheel three shopping carts out of a Ralph's grocery store and deliver them -- and earned $12.68 for the job. The customer did not tip. (Under the older, more transparent pay model, they would have earned $44.19.) "That's a real slap in the face," they told Motherboard.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

The early reveal of next-gen systems has sent current-gen sales plummeting in the US

Eurogamer - Sun, 16/02/2020 - 18:29

Sales of both the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One in the US are declining faster than expected, says an industry report.

In a report by market analysts NPD Group (thanks, VGC), US hardware spending was down 35 per cent in January 2020 when compared with the same period a year ago. Total spending across gaming as a whole - including hardware, software, accessories and game cards - was also lower year-over-year, dropping 26 per cent.

"An interesting takeaway from the US NPD report is that PS4 and XB1 hardware sales in Jan 2020 are considerably lower than PS3 and 360 were in Jan 2013," posited Niko Partners analyst, Daniel Ahmad. "Next-gen consoles are around the corner but both are declining sharper than expected. Switch continues to remain steady."

Read more

Categories: Video Games

The new Uncharted movie is "an origin story to the games", says lead Tom Holland

Eurogamer - Sun, 16/02/2020 - 18:07

Despite a myriad of issues, delays, and personnel changes, actor Tom Holland insists the script for the (hopefully?) upcoming Uncharted movies is "one of the best [he's] ever read".

"I read the newest draft of the script on the way over here and it's one of the best scripts I've ever read," Holland told IGN this week. "It really, really jumps off the page."

As Tom reported last month, Sony's increasingly-unlikely-looking Uncharted film has now lost its sixth director. Travis Knight, who previously helmed Transformers spin-off Bumblebee, was the latest to be named director of the project. That was back in October, after fifth director Dan Tractenberg quit last August.

Read more

Categories: Video Games

The best Black Friday 4K TV deal returns: £999 for the LG B9 OLED

Eurogamer - Sun, 16/02/2020 - 17:47

Our favourite 4K TV for HDR gaming, the 55-inch LG B9 OLED, has been discounted to £999 at PRC Direct, complete with a five year warranty. To get this sub-£1000 price, you'll need to use code 20FEB300 in the checkout for a healthy reduction of £300 off the listed cost.

This is the lowest price we've ever seen for this TV, equalling the best deal we saw back on Black Friday a few months back. For reference, this exactly model was selling for £1600 as recently as last autumn!

So why do Digital Foundry love LG OLEDs so much - and why did we name this one the best 4K TV for HDR gaming? Well, OLED televisions are renowned for their picture quality, with the organic LEDs inside capable of turning completely black instead of just very dark grey as you'd expect with an LED. That means the contrast between the lightest and darkest areas of the screen is nearly infinite, letting the TV look stunning in dark scenes - particularly in HDR.

Read more

Categories: Video Games

Firefox, Wordpress Move to Support Lazy Loading of Images and iFrames

Slashdot - Sun, 16/02/2020 - 17:34
"Lazy Loading" would augment HTML's <img> tag (and <iframe> tag) with two new attributes -- "eager" (to load immediately) and "lazy" (to load only when it becomes relevant in the viewport). Felix Arntz, a developer programs engineer at Google (and a WordPress core committer) notes the updates in the HTML specification for the lazy loading attributes, adding that it's "already supported by several browsers, including Chrome and Edge" and also the Android browser and Opera. And lazy loading can now also be toggled on for Firefox 75 Nightly users, reports Neowin, though it's disabled by default: It's not clear if it will be enabled by the time Firefox 75 reaches the stable branch but according to comments on the Bugzilla thread, it's in high demand. Previously, websites could employ lazy loading by using JavaScript but now lazy loading syntax is supported directly in the web browser. The implementation in Firefox comes after Google added the feature to its browser. Google's Arntz has also written a post describing a proposal to begin lazy-loading images by default in Wordpress. The proposed solution is available as a feature plugin WP Lazy Loading in the plugin repository. The plugin is being developed on GitHub. Your testing and feedback will be much appreciated.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Sorry, but you can't use unearned attachments in Call of Duty: Modern Warfare anymore

Eurogamer - Sun, 16/02/2020 - 17:01

Activision has fixed an exploit that permitted Call of Duty: Modern Warfare players to use attachments they hadn't organically unlocked in the game.

In the brief patch notes (thanks, VG24/7), the developer also revealed it had addressed unspecified "exploit fixes on various maps and modes", made some - again, unspecified - changes to the backend, and fixed a bug that left some players' CDL filter active even after they'd joined a party without CDL filters.

Following an accidental data dump on the Call of Duty website last weekend, a new leak - this one from an official source via an Activision account on Xbox Live - confirmed Rust will be making an appearance in season two, along with three other multiplayer maps: Atlas Superstore, Bazaar, and Zhokov Boneyard.

Read more

Categories: Video Games

Revisiting Road Rash on 3DO - one of the system's greatest games

Eurogamer - Sun, 16/02/2020 - 17:00

Isn't it about time we had a reboot of Electronic Arts' Road Rash franchise? Combining traditional racing with bike-to-bike violence, Road Rash was one of EA's most exciting titles back in the early 90s, making a fantastic debug on Sega Mega Drive before making the transition onto what were then the next generation consoles. However, before the series hit the Sony PlayStation and Sega Saturn, we got our first taste of how the series would evolve into an actual three-dimensional experience - in July 1994, Road Rash arrived on 3DO.

One of the first 'next-gen' consoles with 3D capabilities delivering games via optical disc, the 3DO Interactive Multiplayer is something of a curiosity. Similar to the MSX of yore, the 3DO Company put together what you might call a reference design that was available for licensing, with manufacturing heavyweights such as Panasonic, LG (then known as Goldstar) and Sanyo each delivering their own take on the hardware across the system's relatively short lifespan.

Out of the box, the 3DO's best video output was a 480i interlaced video signal delivered via S-Video - which is something of a problem in terms of image quality as the internal framebuffer was actually a more traditional 320x240, or 240p. That's where Black Dog Technology's 3DORGB mod comes into play. Piggy-backing onto the GPU, the 3DORGB bypasses the system's internal interpolation and brings the best quality progressive scan output to the fore.

Read more

Categories: Video Games

Watch Out: This Verizon Smishing Scam Is Crazy Realistic

Slashdot - Sun, 16/02/2020 - 16:34
Slashdot reader Iwastheone shared a warning from the editor-in-chief at How-To Geek about a "shockingly convincing" scam: The scam text message says, "Your Verizon account security needs validation" and invites you to tap a link to "validate your account." Once you do, you end up at a phishing website that looks almost exactly like Verizon's real website. The fake website asks for your My Verizon mobile number or user ID and password. After you provide those, it'll ask for your account PIN. Finally, it requests all your personal details to "identify yourself." For smishing scams, this is convincing work. The website looks real and authentic — if you don't look too hard at the address, which isn't actually Verizon's actual website... At the end of the process, the phishing website thanks you for providing your information and "redirects you to the home page." For maximum deception, the phishing website actually redirects you to Verizon's real website at the end of the process. If you don't look too close, you might be deceived into thinking you were on Verizon's website the whole time. What's the game? We didn't provide real Verizon account details, so we can't say for sure. The scammer will probably try to take over your Verizon account, order smartphones on credit, and stick you with the bill.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Meet Oryx and Iana, Rainbow Six Siege's Y5 S1 latest operators

Eurogamer - Sun, 16/02/2020 - 16:22

Following the reveal of Rainbow Six Siege's first season of Year 5, Void Edge, Ubisoft has revealed the next two operatives coming to the competitive shooter: Iana and Oryx.

While Jordan-born Oryx is the first operator that ships without a gadget, he'll compensate with two abilities, one that allows him to jump up through hatches and another, Remah Dash, with which he can dash-attack not just walls but enemies, too.

"Stable, sure, and predictable" Iana will be able to confuse foes with Replicator, a gadget that deploys a hologram that the player can directly control.

Read more

Categories: Video Games

This mod will let you play the entirety of GTA 5 in VR

Eurogamer - Sun, 16/02/2020 - 16:00

It's weird how VR can make a familiar game feel like a completely new experience. For example, I've played GTA 5 many a time before and on multiple platforms, but looking at the world of Los Santos through the twin lenses of a VR headset allowed me to spot so many little details that I'd missed on previous visits.

The best way I've found to describe this phenomenon to non-VR users is to liken it to looking through a holiday brochure at photos of a resort you're planning on visiting. The resort looks beautiful from the pictures sure, and in your mind's eye you can easily picture yourself sat there by the side of the pool, sipping on a cocktail.

But those flat images are nothing compared to the feeling of actually being there in person, to stand by that pool and to see the size of it in three dimensions. To know the depth of it by peering over the edge into the water or to spot the little weeds or odd bits of wear and tear dotted around the paths that surround it because in the photos they masked by all the scenery.

Read more

Categories: Video Games

What America's NSA Thinks of Python

Slashdot - Sun, 16/02/2020 - 14:34
"Now budding Python developers can read up on the National Security Agency's own Python training materials," reports ZDNet: Software engineer Chris Swenson filed a Freedom of Information Act request with the NSA for access to its Python training materials and received a lightly redacted 400-page printout of the agency's COMP 3321 Python training course. Swenson has since scanned the documents, ran OCR on the text to make it searchable, and hosted it on Digital Oceans Spaces. The material has also been uploaded to the Internet Archive... "If you don't know any programming languages yet, Python is a good place to start. If you already know a different language, it's easy to pick Python on the side. Python isn't entirely free of frustration and confusion, but hopefully you can avoid those parts until long after you get some good use out of Python," writes the NSA... Swenson told ZDNet that it was "mostly just curiosity" that motivated him to ask the NSA about its Python training material. He also said the NSA had excluded some course material, but that he'll keep trying to get more from the agency... Python developer Kushal Das has pulled out some interesting details from the material. He found that the NSA has an internal Python package index, that its GitLab instance is gitlab.coi.nsa.ic.gov, and that it has a Jupyter gallery that runs over HTTPS. NSA also offers git installation instructions for CentOS, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Ubuntu, and Windows, but not Debian.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

GeForce Now has pulled Activision Blizzard games because they weren't supposed to be there in the first place

Eurogamer - Sun, 16/02/2020 - 13:46

Nvidia has removed all Activision Blizzard games from its GeForce Now cloud subscription service following a "misunderstanding" with the developer/publisher.

While players participating in the closed beta were able to play Activision games like Call of Duty: Modern Warfare and Overwatch as part of the service, founding members who signed up after the 90-day free trial went live on 4th February noticed that the games were quietly removed without explanation just a few days later.

In a comment to Bloomberg (thanks, PC Gamer), a Nvidia representative explained that while Activision had permitted its games to be part of beta test, the two companies had not discussed licensing terms beyond that beta. Consequently, Nvidia was forced to remove the titles, adding: "per their request, please be advised Activision Blizzard games will be removed from the service".

Read more

Categories: Video Games

Police Say Amazon's Ring Isn't Much of a Crime Fighter

Slashdot - Sun, 16/02/2020 - 10:34
Ring's promotional video includes the police chief of the small Florida suburb of Winter Park saying "we understand the value of those cameras in helping us solve crimes." But over the last 22 months, their partnership with Ring hasn't actually led to a single arrest, reports NBC News. The only crime it solved was a 13-year-old boy who opened two delivered packages, decided he didn't like what was inside, and rode away on his bike. "Eventually the boy was sent to a state diversion program for first-time offenders in lieu of being formally charged in court." Ring promises to "make neighborhoods safer" by deterring and helping to solve crimes, citing its own research that says an installation of its doorbell cameras reduces burglaries by more than 50 percent. But an NBC News Investigation has found -- after interviews with 40 law enforcement agencies in eight states that have partnered with Ring for at least three months -- that there is little concrete evidence to support the claim. Three agencies said the ease with which the public can share Ring videos means officers spend time reviewing clips of non-criminal issues such as racoons and petty disagreements between neighbors. Others noted that the flood of footage generated by Ring cameras rarely led to positive identifications of suspects, let alone arrests. Thirteen of the 40 jurisdictions reached, including Winter Park, said they had made zero arrests as a result of Ring footage. Thirteen were able to confirm arrests made after reviewing Ring footage, while two offered estimates. The rest, including large cities like Phoenix, Miami, and Kansas City, Missouri, said that they don't know how many arrests had been made as a result of their relationship with Ring -- and therefore could not evaluate its effectiveness -- even though they had been working with the company for well over a year... None of the departments said they collect data to measure the impact of their Ring partnership in terms of reducing or deterring crimes, nor did they consistently record when Ring footage was helpful in identifying or arresting a suspect... "There's a deafening lack of evidence that any city has been made safer," Liz O'Sullivan, the technology director of the Surveillance Technology Oversight Project, a nonprofit that fights excessive local and state-level surveillance, told NBC News. The lack of evidence that Ring reduces crime adds to a list of concerns that have plagued the company in recent months, ranging from bad security practices to privacy questions surrounding the company's plans to incorporate facial recognition, among other biometric characteristics. NBC News also spoke to Ben Stickle, a professor of criminal justice at Middle Tennessee State University (and a former police officer) who published an academic study analyzing the effectiveness of Ring cameras as a deterrent. "If you expect the camera to deter people, you're assuming that they see it and that they care. Those are two big assumptions." Ring's claim that its doorbell cameras reduce crime seem to be based on a 2015 report by a police captain in Los Angeles' wealthy Wilshire Park neighborhood of a 55% drop in burglaries after Ring cameras were installed on 10% of the doors. But in an overlooked follow-up, MIT's Technology Review reported that in 2017, Wilshire Park "suffered more burglaries than in any of the previous seven years."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

The inescapable impact of plastics in the video game industry

Eurogamer - Sun, 16/02/2020 - 10:00

Ed Annunziata loves the ocean.

"I can hear the waves right now!" he tells me from his home on the coast of Northern California. "I knew when I moved from New York that I needed to live by the ocean. I've always been enthralled by the dichotomy of its beauty and the dangers it harbors. What's more terrifying than something swimming from the darkness towards you? Yet, what's more gorgeous than a coral reef teeming with life?"

It's an idea reflected in Annuziata's games, most notably, Ecco, his beloved series about a dolphin fighting to save the ecosystem and his species from mysterious aliens and human oppression. It is often considered one of the first environmental ocean games, but even Ecco couldn't predict the threat that would be posed by plastic pollution.

Read more

Categories: Video Games

Free Coding Bootcamp 'Lambda' Tries Selling Its Income-Sharing Agreements -- In Bundles

Slashdot - Sun, 16/02/2020 - 07:34
An anonymous reader quotes the Verge: In December, online coding bootcamp Lambda School quietly partnered with Edly, a digital marketplace that helps schools sell income-sharing agreements (ISAs) to accredited investors. The arrangement allows Lambda to receive money from the ISAs upfront, rather than waiting for students to find jobs. But it also flies in the face of the values Lambda typically espouses: namely, that ISAs align its incentives with the goals and aspirations of the students... Lambda's ISAs promise an alternative to traditional student loans by allowing students to defer tuition until they've landed a job that pays $50,000 a year or more. When that happens, they hand over 17 percent of their income until the $30,000 tuition is paid off. If students don't find work within five years of completing the program, the ISA is automatically dissolved. It's a business model that allows Lambda to brag about investing in students — which, in many ways, it still does. The school provides living stipends and even housing to some students who need it. But reselling ISAs muddies the narrative a bit since Lambda can make money long before students find jobs... Shortly after the arrangement was called out on Twitter, following a report by The Verge about some students' disappointment with the curriculum, Edly began taking down pages that referenced the Lambda partnership. Edly did not immediately respond to a request for comment about why these pages were taken down, and Lambda declined to comment on the nature of the partnership at all. "I wonder why Lambda isn't so keen on seeing discussions about how students are being packed into the same kind of CDOs that brought us the financial crisis," tweeted David Heinemeier Hansson, the creator of Ruby on Rails, who's been tweeting screenshots of Edly's past statements about their ambitions as well as links to Google's cache of Edly's pitches to investors. Last year Wired reported that nearly half of Lambda's ISAs had at least partly been sold off to investors. They also note that in January of 2019, Lambda "received $30 million from investors including Google Ventures, Y Combinator, and Ashton Kutcher."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

China Quarantines Cash to Sanitize Old Bank Notes From Coronavirus

Slashdot - Sun, 16/02/2020 - 04:34
Today China announced it was taking unusual new steps to help stop the spread of the coronavirus. It's blocking the transfer of old bank notes between provinces and cities affected by the outbreak, according to the deputy governor of the People's Bank of China — and that's just the beginning. Bloomberg reports: The central bank also ramped up measures to sanitize old money to reduce contagion risks and added 600 billion yuan ($85.9 billion) of new cash for Hubei, the epicenter of the coronavirus, he said. "Money from key virus-hit areas will be sanitized with ultraviolet rays or heated and locked up for at least 14 days, before it is distributed again," Fan said at a press conference on Saturday. Money circulated in less riskier areas is subject to a week of quarantine and commercial lenders have been asked to separate cash from hospitals and food markets, he said. The share of cash in broad money supply has dropped steadily in recent years in China, with the rise of mobile payments largely replacing bank notes in daily life. "It's an extreme move that makes sense," argues Quartz: Whether it's dollars, pounds, euros, shekels, or in this case yuan, currency is notoriously dirty. A 2017 study [PDF] of $1 bills in New York found some 397 bacterial species living on the surface. And when someone with the flu handles it, that virus has been shown to survive for up to 12 days. The World Health Organization has said that it is still not known how long the the coronavirus can survive on surfaces and objects, including money. Preliminary information has shown it can survive a few hours or more, but can be killed with basic disinfectants.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

'Sonic the Hedgehog' Has Biggest-Ever Opening For a Video Game Adaptation

Slashdot - Sun, 16/02/2020 - 02:34
An anonymous reader quotes The Wrap: "Sonic the Hedgehog" is giving Paramount its best box office news in over a year, with a currently 3-day opening weekend of $55 million to become the best opening weekend ever for a video game adaptation... The delayed release of this film prompted by an intense rejection of Sonic's initial design is turning out to be a bit of a blessing in disguise. Moved from last November to this extended Presidents' Day weekend, "Sonic" is standing out in the movie marketplace as a popular family offering with no major competition currently in theaters and none coming until Pixar's "Onward" arrives in three weeks. Audience reception, driven by both families and hardcore Sonic fans, has been very strong with an A on CinemaScore, 4/5 on Postrak, and 95% audience score on Rotten Tomatoes. Even critics have been fairly positive with a 65% Rotten Tomatoes score... If this weekend's estimates hold, "Sonic" will have an opening weekend that's more than double any of Paramount's 2019 films, including the $29 million opening of "Terminator: Dark Fate." In fact, it has the highest opening weekend for the studio since "Mission: Impossible — Fallout," which opened to $61.2 million in July 2018. The Wrap's article also includes a list ranking "all 46 videogame movies" from best to worst. They rank 2001's "Tomb Raider" just ahead of 2018's "Tomb Raider" (at #14 and #15, respectively), and also remember several forgotten early-1990s films based on videogames (including "Street Fighter," "Mortal Kombat" and "Super Mario Bros.")

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Northrop Grumman Launches Spacecraft Delivering Snacks and Equipment To the ISS

Slashdot - Sun, 16/02/2020 - 01:34
Space.com has footage of Northrop Grumman's successful launch of a spacecraft that's bringing 7,500 pounds of supplies (as well as scientific equipment for experiments) to the astronauts on the International Space Station: Those experiments include studies into bone loss from prolonged exposure to weightlessness, bacteria-targeting viruses that could lead to new medications, as well as some cowpeas to be grown as part of a space food experiment. Heidi Parris, NASA's assistant program scientist for the International Space Station program's science office, said those experiments aim to use the weightless environment on the station to learn more about how to live off Earth, including on the moon and Mars. One novel experiment is Mochii, a small scanning electron microscope about the size of a breadbox that can help astronauts quickly identify the composition of small particles, such as debris or contamination in spacesuits. "Currently the ISS has a blind spot, in that we can't perform this kind of analysis on orbit," James Martinez, a materials scientist at NASA's Johnson Space Center participating in the experiment... Another key experiment on Cygnus is the Spacecraft Fire Experiment IV, or Saffire-IV. As its name suggests, Saffire-IV is the fourth experiment to study how fire behaves in space Northrop Grumman's Cygnus is one of two private spacecraft (SpaceX's Dragon capsules are the other) that currently haul cargo to the International Space Station for NASA. NG-13 is the 13th Cygnus mission to reach space for NASA by Northrop Grumman as part of the agency's Commercial Resupply Services... Northrop Grumman's Cygnus NG-13 spacecraft will arrive at the International Space Station and be captured by a robotic arm on Tuesday, Feb. 18, at 4 a.m. EST (0900 GMT). NASA's live webcast of the rendezvous will begin at 2:30 a.m. EST (0730 GMT) and run through spacecraft capture. The spacecraft will also be bringing the astronauts candy, fresh fruit, and three different kinds of cheese wedge -- cheddar, Parmesan and Fontina.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff
Syndicate content