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Florida's Fired Covid-19 Data Manager 'Permanently Suspended' From Twitter

Slashdot - Sat, 12/06/2021 - 05:30
Florida's fired Department of Health data manager Rebekah Jones has been "permanently suspended" from Twitter, "for violations of the Twitter Rules on spam and platform manipulation," a Twitter spokesperson tells Slashdot. Florida's Sun-Sentinel reports: Jones, a former Department of Health data manager fired for alleged insubordination, emerged as a political lightning rod as COVID-19 cases spiked in Florida last year. Supporters see her as a whistleblower speaking truth to power and exposing an effort by the state to paint a rosier picture of the pandemic. Her detractors say she has peddled disinformation for her own financial benefit, unfairly casting doubt on the reliability of Florida's COVID-19 statistics... Jones helped to build the state's online coronavirus dashboard in the early days of the pandemic. In May 2020, she was fired from her post at the Florida Department of Health, where she was manager of Geographic Information Systems. Jones said her bosses pressured her to manipulate statistics to justify reopening the state amid lockdown. In an article Monday Forbes investigated "the curious case of Rebekah Jones' suspension," citing a researcher who specializes in Twitter fraud: There was clearly a concentrated surge in new follower activity... What is not known is whether Rebekah Jones purchased the followers herself, or whether it was a false-flag campaign meant to discredit her (someone else purchased the followers and directed them at her account to make it appear she broke Twitter's rules). Nearly 21,000 followers were added in a short amount of time... Following up with Twitter's spokesperson, Slashdot asked them about Forbes' theory, and whether they had evidence that Jones herself (and not one of her detractors) had perpetrated the surge in follower activity. Twitter's response? "We have nothing further to add beyond what I shared." Jones had already attained more than 400,000 followers, reports the Washington Post. But they also note that her suspension is now being celebrated on Twitter by Florida governor DeSantis's press secretary, "who was hired after she wrote an article calling Jones's claims 'a big lie.'" DeSantis's office also pointed to an April Twitter thread from a prominent disinformation researcher alleging that an app has surreptitiously directed thousands of users to follow a number of accounts, including Jones's. Jones responded to the researcher, according to a screenshot, with a tweet saying: "This is insane." "I've never heard of this app," she wrote. Jones has since opened a new account on Instagram named "insubordinatescientist".

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Phishing Sites Reached All-Time High In January 2021

Slashdot - Sat, 12/06/2021 - 03:00
The number of active phishing sites hit a record number earlier this year in January, according to an industry report published this week by the Anti-Phishing Working Group (APWG). The Record reports: A total of 245,771 phishing sites were detected in January. The number represents the unique base URLs of phishing sites found and reported by APWG members. The APWG is an industry coalition made up of more than 2,200 organizations from the cyber-security industry, government, law enforcement, and NGOs sector, which includes some big names such as Microsoft, Facebook, PayPal, ICANN, AT&T, Comcast, Digicert, Cloudflare, Cisco, Salesforce, RSA, Verisign, ESET, McAfee, Avast, Symantec, Trend Micro, PhishLabs, Agari, Cofense, and many others. APWG experts noted that while the number of phishing sites declined in February, the next month, in March, the number of phishing sites jumped above 200,000 again, amounting to the fourth-worst month in APWG's reporting history. The industry vertical most targeted in phishing attacks in Q1 remained the financial sector, which saw almost a quarter of all phishing attempts. Second was social media, with cybercrime groups attempting to hijack social media accounts to resell online on specialized marketplaces, according to the APWG report (PDF). Furthermore, around 83% of all phishing sites seen in Q1 2020 were also hosted on an HTTP-based connection. This finding reinforces a piece of well-known cybersecurity advice that if a website is loaded via HTTPS, it doesn't mean it's secure, but merely that its traffic can't be easily intercepted.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Google Announces Bold New Changes To Chrome OS Release Cycle

Slashdot - Sat, 12/06/2021 - 02:02
In a blog post this morning, Google announced plans to increase its update cadence for Chromebooks. Like Chrome, its operating system will now also follow a four-week Stable channel before moving to the next major milestone release. Android Police reports: Google will deliver fresh features more rapidly to Chromebooks starting with Chrome OS 96 -- all while keeping it stable, secure, and speedy. To adapt to the rigorous update release schedule, Google will skip Chrome OS 95, which will help it bridge the gap between M94 and Chrome's new four-week rollout strategy. Enterprise and education folks can opt enroll in an Extended Stable option for Chromebooks, which will update every 6 months. In light of the new rollout strategy, Google updated its documentation and pushed an update to its release calendar. The company will share plans about the choices Chrome OS administrators will have for milestone updates "in the coming months."

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Apple Admits It Ranked Its Files App Ahead of Competitor Dropbox

Slashdot - Sat, 12/06/2021 - 01:20
During the Epic v. Apple trial, an email chain surfaced that reveals Apple seemingly admitted "it manually boosted the ranking of its own Files app ahead of the competition for 11 entire months," reports The Verge. This comes after two monstrous reports by The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times showed Apple's App Store clearly and consistently ranking its own apps ahead of competitors. Apple claimed it had done nothing wrong. The Verge reports: "We are removing the manual boost and the search results should be more relevant now," wrote Apple app search lead Debankur Naskar, after the company was confronted by Epic Games CEO Tim Sweeney over Apple's Files app showing up first when searching for Dropbox. "Dropbox wasn't even visible on the first page [of search results]," Sweeney wrote. As you'll see, Naskar suggested that Files had been intentionally boosted for that exact search result during the "last WWDC." That would have been WWDC 2017, nearly a year earlier, when the Files apps first debuted. The email chain actually reflects fairly well on Apple overall. Apple's Matt Fischer (VP of the App Store) clearly objects to the idea at first. "[W]ho green lit putting the Files app above Dropbox in organic search results? I didn't know we did that, and I don't think we should," he says. But he does end the conversation with "In the future, I want any similar requests to come to me for review/approval," suggesting that he's not entirely ruling out manual overrides. But Apple tells The Verge that what we think we're seeing in these emails isn't quite accurate. While Apple didn't challenge the idea that Files was unfairly ranked over Dropbox, the company says the reality was a simple mistake: the Files app had a Dropbox integration, so Apple put "Dropbox" into the app's metadata, and it was automatically ranked higher for "Dropbox" searches as a result. I'm slightly skeptical of that explanation -- partially because it doesn't line up with what Naskar suggests in the email, partially because Apple also told me it immediately fixed the error (despite it apparently continuing to exist for 11 months, hardly immediate), and partially because the company repeatedly ignored my questions about whether this has ever happened with other apps before. The most Apple would tell me is that it didn't manually boost Files over competitors, and that "we do not advantage our apps over those of any developer or competitor" as a general rule.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Third Member of US FDA Advisory Panel Resigns Over Alzheimer's Drug Approval

Slashdot - Sat, 12/06/2021 - 00:40
A third member of a panel of outside advisers to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has resigned in protest over the agency's decision to approve Biogen's Alzheimer's disease treatment despite the committee's recommendation against doing so. Reuters reports: Aaron Kesselheim, a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School who had served on the FDA's advisory committee for nervous system drugs since 2015, told Reuters on Thursday he was stepping down from the panel. "My rationale was that the FDA needs to re-evaluate how it solicits and uses the advisory committees ... because I didn't think that the firm recommendations from the committee in this case ... were appropriately integrated into the decision-making process," Kesselheim said in an email. He cited FDA's decision to approve Sarepta Therapeutic's drug, eteplirsen, for Duchenne muscular dystrophy in 2016 as another example of the regulator approving a drug against the recommendations of its advisory committee. On Tuesday, a member of the advisory group who voted against the approval, Washington University neurologist Dr. Joel Perlmutter, resigned from the committee, citing the FDA's approval of Aduhelm. Mayo Clinic neurologist Dr. David Knopman said he resigned on Wednesday. The 11-member committee voted nearly unanimously in November that Biogen's drug should not be approved, citing inconclusive evidence that the drug was effective.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Global Banking Regulators Call For Toughest Rules For Cryptocurrencies

Slashdot - Sat, 12/06/2021 - 00:00
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: Global regulators have said cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin should come with the toughest bank capital rules to avoid putting the wider financial system at risk should their value collapse suddenly. The Basel Committee on Banking Supervision, which consists of regulators from the world's leading financial centers, is proposing a "new conservative prudential treatment" for crypto-assets that would force banks to put aside enough capital to cover 100% of potential losses. That would be the highest capital requirement of any asset, illustrating that cryptocurrencies and related investments are seen as far more risky and volatile than conventional stocks or bonds. The world's most powerful banking standards setter warned on Thursday that certain crypto-assets had proved to be highly volatile, meaning they could "present risks for banks as exposures increase, including liquidity risk; credit risk; market risk; operational risk (including fraud and cyber risks); money laundering/terrorist financing risk; and legal and reputation risks." However, it said looser rules could apply to stablecoins -- a new form of digital asset usually pegged to the value of a traditional currency -- that may require only a level of capital rules applied to traditional assets such as bonds, loans, deposits, equities or commodities. The committee's proposals, which will now go out for consultation, are meant to help protect the global financial system in case cryptocurrency prices plummet.

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UK Lawmakers Ask Biden To Drop Charges Against WikiLeaks Founder Julian Assange

Slashdot - Fri, 11/06/2021 - 23:20
A cross-party group of 24 British members of Parliament wrote to President Joe Biden on Friday asking him to drop all charges against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange. CNET News adds: Dropping the charges would be "an act that would be a clarion call for freedom that would echo around the globe," they said. Together, the lawmakers pointed out that while Biden was vice president, he played an important role in choosing not to prosecute Assange over WikiLeaks' publication of classified documents relating to the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, as well as the conditions in Guantanamo Bay. In spite of this, they added, Biden -- who is in the UK attending the G7 summit -- has not chosen to drop the charges brought against Assange during Donald Trump's presidency.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Here's a first (brisk) look at The Witcher's second season on Netflix

Eurogamer - Fri, 11/06/2021 - 22:49

It's been almost a year and a half since our coins were well and truly tossed by Netflix's inaugural season of The Witcher, so anticipation is understandably high for news on Season Two. As part of its Geeked Week of reveals, Netflix teased a first look at things to come, and it's delivered exactly that - albeit limiting itself to just 12 measly seconds of footage.

Even before the conclusion of The Witcher's well-received first season, Netflix confirmed an eventual return for Geralt, Jennefer, Ciri, and Jaskier (as played by Henry Cavill, Anya Chalotra, Freya Allan, and Joey Batey respectively).

Since then, we've learned the second season - which promises to dial back on the time-hopping antics of its predecessor - will usher in new cast members including Simon Callow as the Dorian detective Codringher, Silent Witness' Liz Carr as business partner Fenn, Bridgerton's Adjoa Andoh as priestess Nenneke, and Brave New World's Cassie Clare as Phillippa Eilhart, sorceress and advisor to King Vizimir.

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Categories: Video Games

New York Senate Passes Landmark Right To Repair Bill

Slashdot - Fri, 11/06/2021 - 22:40
A Right to Repair bill that would give everyone the information, parts, and tools they need to fix their electronic devices passed in the New York State Senate, the first such bill to pass in the country. Kevin Purdy writes via iFixit: At a virtual session, the Senate approved S4104 by a margin of 51 to 12. Normally the next step would be a vote on an identical bill in the state's Assembly. But Thursday is the last day of session for the NY legislature, and the bill has not yet escaped committee, making a vote by the full Assembly unlikely. The battle for fair repair in New York will continue into next year's session, with a strong record of success. But don't get the wrong idea -- this is big. This shows that Right to Repair has real support when the issue gets an actual vote, despite the efforts of tech manufacturers' lobbyists. Sen. Philip Boyle, a Republican from Bay Shore on Long Island and the bill's original sponsor, said at Thursday's session that the Digital Fair Repair Act both protected consumers from monopolistic companies and curtailed e-waste. Customers can fix their own "smartphones, tablets, and farm equipment," Boyle said. Or, if they have "no technical skills at all, like me," they can turn to local repair shops and reuse programs to avoid simply tossing things out, Boyle said. While time is likely to run out on the Assembly bill, New Yorkers can still tell their representatives to move next year's bill to a vote, and to vote yes. A U.S. PIRG survey found that New Yorkers would save a collective $2.4 billion per year by fixing electronics instead of replacing them. The average family stands to save $330 per year, and help curtail the 655,000 tons of e-waste generated in New York each year.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Amazon, eBay Fight Legislation That Would Unmask Third-Party Sellers

Slashdot - Fri, 11/06/2021 - 22:02
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: Amazon and a who's who of online-only retailers are trying to kill proposed federal and state legislation that would make the companies disclose contact information for third-party sellers. The bills would force Amazon and others to verify the identities of third-party sellers and provide consumers with ways to contact the stores. The proposed legislation is pitting brick-and-mortar retailers -- including Home Depot, Walgreens, and JC Penney, which support the bills -- against online retailers like Amazon, Etsy, eBay, Poshmark, and others, which argue that the legislation would harm small sellers. [...] The online retailers argue that the bills would compromise the privacy of third-party sellers. On some platforms, the majority of merchants run their businesses out of their homes. Etsy, for example, says 97 percent of its sellers do. A survey of Amazon sellers found that 70 percent have work outside of their Amazon businesses, suggesting that they, too, run the business from their homes. That anonymity, though, provides cover for fraudsters. It's not uncommon to find counterfeit and potentially harmful items on marketplace sites. In 2018, the Government Accountability Office ordered 47 items, including shoes, travel mugs, cosmetics, and phone chargers, from third-party sellers on "popular consumer websites" and determined that 20 of them were counterfeit. Even non-counterfeit items bought from third-party sellers have been implicated in consumer harm. In April 2018, a 19-month-old in Texas was injured after ingesting a battery that fell out of a loose battery compartment in a third-party Apple TV remote. The parents asked Amazon to stop selling the defective product and requested contact information for Hu Xi Jie, who ran the Amazon store "USA Shopping 7693" that sold the remote. Hu Xi Jie never responded, and Amazon was not able to locate the individual. The parents sued Amazon in Texas state court, arguing that the retailer is liable for the defective product. Amazon, on the other hand, says it serves as a middleman and bears no liability. It's that argument, among others, that has brick-and-mortar retailers pushing for changes. Consumer product laws hold businesses like Target and Home Depot liable for injuries if the stores do not take sufficient measures to keep defective products from reaching consumers. Online marketplaces haven't been subject to those rules since they don't control third-party sellers.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Trump Justice Department Subpoenaed Apple for Data From House Intelligence Committee Democrats

Slashdot - Fri, 11/06/2021 - 21:24
Prosecutors in the Trump administration Justice Department subpoenaed Apple for data from the accounts of House Intelligence Committee Democrats -- including Chairman Adam Schiff -- along with their staff and family members as part of a leak investigation, an Intelligence Committee official and a source familiar with the matter confirmed to CNN. From a report: Rep. Eric Swalwell of California, another Democrat on the committee, told CNN's Don Lemon on Thursday evening that he was notified that his data had been seized as part of the probe as well. The prosecutors, the New York Times first reported, were looking for the sources behind news stories about contacts between Russia and Trump associates. The leak hunt began with the FBI sending a subpoena to Apple in February 2018, which included a gag order, seeking metadata on more than 100 accounts as part of an investigation into the disclosure of classified information, the person familiar with the matter said. The gag order was renewed three times before it expired this year and Apple notified the customers. The House Intelligence Committee determined that along with members of the panel and staff, the dragnet collected the records of family members, including at least one minor, the person said. Records seized included those from staff members who had nothing to do with issues related to Russia or former FBI Director James Comey, including Schiff's personal office staff, a House Intelligence Committee source told CNN. Democratic committee leadership is relying on self-reporting to know who has been impacted at this point -- both members and staff, the source said. Swalwell confirmed to CNN that records of family members and a minor had been obtained.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Netflix's Castlevania is getting a spin-off series set during the French Revolution

Eurogamer - Fri, 11/06/2021 - 21:15

Netflix's animated adaptation of legendary video game series Castlevania is now at the end of its acclaimed four-season run, and fans have been wondering what comes next. Today brings answer: more Castlevania, but different.

Castlevania's future on Netflix was left in doubt when the streaming service opted to wind up the series in its current guise after showrunner Warren Ellis departed from the show following allegations of sexual misconduct. However, subsequent rumours suggested a spin-off was in the works, and Netflix has now made that official.

With Castlevania's current run now concluded, Netflix is working on a brand-new series that will take Richter Belmont (a distant descendant of original series leads Trevor Belmont and Sypha Belndaes) and Maria Renard - both familiar characters to game fans - to 1792 France for an adventure that unfolds against the backdrop of the French Revolution.

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Categories: Video Games

Apple Adds Support For Windows Precision Touchpad Gestures in New Boot Camp Update

Slashdot - Fri, 11/06/2021 - 21:02
Apple is finally adding support for Windows Precision Touchpad drivers in its latest Boot Camp update. The new 6.1.15 update includes support for Windows Precision Touchpad, including single tap to click, lower-right corner to right-click, down motion to scroll up, and three or four finger gestures. From a report: Various Reddit users noticed the surprise update went live yesterday, and it apparently works better than third-party solutions like Trackpad++ and mac-precision-touchpad that people have had to use for years. "Works way better than both of them with better palm and thumb detection too," says one Reddit user. Microsoft first started introducing Windows Precision Touchpad with Intel in 2013, in an effort to fix what were notorious PC trackpad issues at the time. It has taken Apple a long time to enable Windows Precision Touchpad in Boot Camp, but not every MacBook is supported. An Apple support document notes that only Mac computers with a T2 chip will be able to access Windows Precision Touchpad, which is most MacBook Air and MacBook Pro models from 2018 onward.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Sable might be one of the most soothing games I've ever played

Eurogamer - Fri, 11/06/2021 - 21:00

It's been a little while since we checked in on Sable, the sci-fi desert game being made by a dev team based in a North London shed, but this week I was able to go hands-on for the very first time - and I'm pleased to report it's not just a looker. Sable might be one of the most soothing games I've ever played, and even its opening stages are capable of producing a powerful sense of wanderlust.

For those who need a refresh, Sable is an open-world game by Shedworks that's coming to Xbox and PC later this year. You play as a young girl who leaves her clan as part of a rite-of-passage ceremony. This takes the form of a solo adventure across the desert, during which Sable must find a mask that represents her identity and role in society. The focus is very much on exploration and parkour, with no combat and a lot of bike-riding.

Before you're unleashed into the wide world, however, you must first learn the basics from your tribe inside an enclosed (but fairly roomy) area. Preparations must be made for the journey - it's not simply a matter of packing a suitcase and sailing away. There are several small tasks and quests that need to be completed before Sable can set off, but they never feel like annoying chores, and there's always some purpose behind them. The game emphasises the bond between a tribe member and their bike, for instance, so retrieving parts to construct Sable's bike feels like you're piecing together something important to her identity. It adds weight to the quest, making the tutorial stages feel meaningful.

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Categories: Video Games

Apple Says Its New Logon Tech is as Easy as Passwords But Far More Secure

Slashdot - Fri, 11/06/2021 - 20:09
Apple has begun testing passkeys, a new authentication technology it says are as easy to use as passwords but vastly more secure. Part of iCloud Keychains, a test version of the technology will come with iPhones, iPads and Macs later this year. From a report: To set up an account on a website or app using a passkey, you first choose a username for the new account, then use FaceID or Touch ID to confirm that it's really you who's using the device. You don't ever pick a password. Your device handles generation and storage of the passkey, which iCloud Keychain synchronizes across all your Apple devices. To use the passkey for authentication later, you'll be prompted to confirm your username and verify yourself with FaceID or Touch ID. Developers must update their login procedures to support passkeys, but it's an adaptation of the existing WebAuthn technology. "Because it's just a single tap to sign in, it's simultaneously easier, faster and more secure than almost all common forms of authentication today," Garrett Davidson, an Apple authentication experience engineer, said Wednesday at the company's annual WWDC developer conference.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Splinter Cell, Far Cry, and Blood Dragon animated series coming to Netflix

Eurogamer - Fri, 11/06/2021 - 19:54

Netflix's apparent mission to give every single video game in the universe the TV show treatment is continuing with three newly announced animated adaptations of Ubisoft properties: Splinter Cell, Far Cry, and unforgettable Far Cry 3 expansion, Blood Dragon.

A Splinter Cell animated adaptation was first rumoured last July, but Ubisoft and Netflix have now made the show official. It'll follows the adventures of iconic video game series protagonist Sam Fisher after he's recruited to work for the NSA's mysterious Echelon Division.

Expect black ops missions, stealth, and military tactics in a series that's being written by John Wick scribe Derek Kolstad. That's pretty much all Netflix has shared right now, other than this appropriately shadowy glimpse of Sam as he'll appear in the show:

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Categories: Video Games

Amazon Will Pay $62 Million Over Deceptive Delivery Tips Claims

Slashdot - Fri, 11/06/2021 - 19:29
Amazon will pay almost $62 million to settle allegations by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission that it avoided handing over the full pay and tips it promised to delivery drivers, according to the agency. From a report: The company is giving back the amount it kept, according to a complaint released earlier this year by the agency, after it told Amazon Flex drivers and customers in 2015 it would pay $18 to $25 hourly plus tips. Instead, beginning the following year, it used tips to supplement lower base pay rates, and tried to hide the changes, according to the FTC.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Airlines Plan To Plow Billions Into Flying Taxis

Slashdot - Fri, 11/06/2021 - 18:45
Flying taxis moved a step closer to becoming a fixture buzzing across urban skyscapes, as a closely watched effort was unveiled in Los Angeles and startups in the U.K. and Brazil made commercial breakthroughs. From a report: Vertical Aerospace Group, based in Bristol, England, won conditional orders for as many as 1,000 electric aircraft that could total $4 billion from buyers including American Airlines Group and Virgin Atlantic Airways, it said late Thursday. Meanwhile, Brazil's Embraer SA said it's in talks to merge its unit developing electric vertical takeoff and landing aircraft into a public company, sending the stock surging. And in California, startup Archer Aviation showcased its future eVTOL after nabbing a $20 million investment from United Airlines Holdings. The carrier plans to buy as many as 200 of the aircraft, dubbed Maker. While none are certified for commercial use, approvals for electric flying taxis could come as early as 2024, according to Europe's top aviation regulator. Airlines are placing orders because they see the potential to develop a new business tied to local transport, as their main activity shuttling people on longer trips comes under pressure over carbon emissions and the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Google Abandons Experiment To Show Simplified Domain URLs in Chrome

Slashdot - Fri, 11/06/2021 - 18:05
Google's experiment to hide parts of a site's URL in the Chrome address bar (the Omnibox) has failed and has been removed from the browser earlier this week. From a report: The experiment ran from June 2020 to June 2021. It consisted of a series of options that Google added to the chrome://flags options page that, when enabled, only showed the main domain name of a site (therecord.media) instead of the full page URL (therecord.media/category/article/title).

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Eurogamer News Cast E3 2021 predictions special!

Eurogamer - Fri, 11/06/2021 - 17:41

E3 is upon us! Last night, Geoff Keighley's Summer Game Fest show ended in spectacular fashion: the full reveal of Elden Ring. Now suitably pumped for the reveals to come, the Eurogamer News Cast has a stab at E3 predictions. Join Eurogamer reporter Emma Kent, news editor Tom Phillips and me in the video below to find out what to expect.

We run through all the major shows set for this weekend and the following couple of days: Ubisoft, Xbox and Bethesda, Square Enix, Capcom, Nintendo Direct and Bandai Namco. There are knowns, known unknowns, and unknown unknowns. Such is E3!

All this and our usual 'what we've been playing' and 'mug check' segments are included in this week's show. Enjoy!

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