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Disco Elysium TV show in the works

Eurogamer - Sat, 27/06/2020 - 16:08

Disco Elysium is being turned into a TV show.

Developer ZA/UM is working with production company dj2 Entertainment to develop a series based on the game, Variety reports.

dj2 CEO and founder Dmitri M. Johnson was co-producer of Sonic the Hedgehog, the highest-grossing video game-based film of all time.

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Categories: Video Games

Dying Light gets DLC based on Techland's unreleased Hellraid in July

Eurogamer - Sat, 27/06/2020 - 15:35

Dying Light gets DLC based on Techland's unreleased dark fantasy game Hellraid in July.

Hellraid is Techland's on-hold first-person fantasy game pitched as a mashup of The Elder Scrolls and Dying Light, and the spiritual successor to Hexen and Witchhaven.

With the future of Hellraid as a standalone game in doubt, Techland has incorporated it into first-person zombie game Dying Light as DLC. Both games are of course very different, so Techland created a fun in-game portal between their worlds - triggered by an arcade machine. Here's the official blurb:

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Categories: Video Games

XMG Apex 15 review: Ryzen 9 3950X in a laptop - and we're not kidding

Eurogamer - Sat, 27/06/2020 - 15:00

The AMD Ryzen 3950X processor has 16 cores and 32 threads, clocking up to a maximum of 4.7GHz. It's the flagship of AMD's super-successful Ryzen 3000 series and a CPU that demolished Intel's high-end desktop processor line-up. And now, as insane and impossible as it might sound, you can run it in a laptop - a 15-inch laptop, no less. So, let's have a moment of hushed awe for the XMG Apex 15, which must surely be the most powerful notebook available right now on the market - certainly in CPU terms. Going into this one, I had a range of questions. How can this possibly work? Why doesn't it just immediately overheat and shutdown?

Answers start to become clear when we consider the nature of the XMG Apex 15 beyond the CPU. Built by a firm that specialises in configurable notebooks, XMG - in common with other PC 'boutique' sellers - uses barebone designs from an ODM (original design manufacturer) which are then customised. This particular chassis is remarkable in that its mainboard is based on AMD's B450 chipset and retains the original AM4 socket, meaning that XMG can insert any desktop CPU in there you want when you order, and later on down the line, you can upgrade it yourself.

The firm was generous enough to supply a new Apex 15 for review kitted out with the Ryzen 9 3950X, 16GB of 3200MHz DDR4 and a Samsung 970 Evo Plus NVMe SSD. Beyond that, it's simplicity itself to remove the lower cover where you have nigh-on instant access to the innards - and there we see just how upgradable this machine is. The memory isn't soldered to the motherboard, you can swap in your own SODIMMs. Next to the NVMe drive is an empty slot for a second SSD, and there's even space for another SATA drive.

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Categories: Video Games

Shakedown: Hawaii coming out on the Wii and the Wii U

Eurogamer - Sat, 27/06/2020 - 14:59

Here's something you don't hear often these days: the announcement of a port for the Wii and the Wii U. But that's exactly what Vblank Entertainment has done.

Open-world action game Shakedown: Hawaii, which launched in May 2019, will soon come out on the 14-year-old Wii and the eight-year-old Wii U - both on disc. Both versions include all of the currently released content and feature updates, designer Brian Provinciano said in a blog post, as well as the ability to play in 4:3 on your old CRT televisions.

The Wii version supports both 50hz and 60hz, and both NTSC and PAL output, and, brilliantly, supports the Wii Remote (with shake), Wii Classic Controller, Wii Classic Controller Pro, and GameCube Controller.

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Dr Disrespect banned by Twitch

Eurogamer - Sat, 27/06/2020 - 14:27

Twitch has banned Dr Disrespect from its platform - reportedly permanent.

Dr Disrespect, aka Guy Beahm, was one of the most popular streamers on Twitch with more than four million followers, and had an exclusive deal with the company.

Esports reported Rod Breslau took to Twitter to say Dr Disrespect's ban was permanent. A reason is not yet known, but Breslau said it had nothing to do with a recent wave of bans relating to DMCA takedowns.

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CRISPR Gene Editing In Human Embryos Wreaks Chromosomal Mayhem

Slashdot - Sat, 27/06/2020 - 12:00
A suite of experiments that use the gene-editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 to modify human embryos have revealed how the process can make large, unwanted changes to the genome at or near the target site. Nature reports: The first preprint was posted online on June 5 by developmental biologist Kathy Niakan of the Francis Crick Institute in London and her colleagues. In that study, the researchers used CRISPR-Cas9 to create mutations in the POU5F1 gene, which is important for embryonic development. Of 18 genome-edited embryos, about 22% contained unwanted changes affecting large swathes of the DNA surrounding POU5F1. They included DNA rearrangements and large deletions of several thousand DNA letters -- much greater than typically intended by researchers using this approach. Another group, led by stem-cell biologist Dieter Egli of Columbia University in New York City, studied embryos created with sperm carrying a blindness-causing mutation in a gene called EYS2. The team used CRISPR-Cas9 to try to correct that mutation, but about half of the embryos tested lost large segments of the chromosome -- and sometimes the entire chromosome -- on which EYS is situated. And a third group, led by reproductive biologist Shoukhrat Mitalipov of Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, studied embryos made using sperm with a mutation that causes a heart condition. This team also found signs that editing affected large regions of the chromosome containing the mutated gene. The three studies offered different explanations for how the DNA changes arose. Egli and Niakan's teams attributed the bulk of the changes observed in their embryos to large deletions and rearrangements. Mitalipov's group instead said that up to 40% of the changes it found were caused by a phenomenon called gene conversion, in which DNA-repair processes copy a sequence from one chromosome in a pair to heal the other. Mitalipov and his colleagues reported similar findings in 2017, but some researchers were skeptical that frequent gene conversions could occur in embryos. They noted that the maternal and paternal chromosomes are not next to each other at the time the gene conversion is postulated to occur, and that the assays the team used to identify gene conversions could have been picking up other chromosomal changes, including deletions. Egli and his colleagues directly tested for gene conversions in their latest preprint and failed to find them, and Burgio points out that the assays used in the Mitalipov preprint are similar to those the team used in 2017. One possibility is that DNA breaks are healed differently at various positions along the chromosome, says Jin-Soo Kim, a geneticist at Seoul National University and a co-author of the Mitalipov preprint.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Pride Week: Seven important lessons toward greater LGBT+ inclusivity

Eurogamer - Sat, 27/06/2020 - 09:00

Hello! All this week we've been celebrating Pride and the power of positive representations in games. Every day we've been bringing you stories and insights from different parts of the LGBT+ community, and if you've missed any of our previous Pride Week features, you'll find a full list below. You can also help support Pride with Eurogamer's newly redesigned t-shirt - all profits from which will be going to charity.

I've dedicated half a decade to diversity and inclusion in games. I am the managing director of Queerly Represent Me (a charity focused on improving representation in games and the industry), I'm co-chair of the IGDA LGBTQ+ SIG, I'm an ambassador for inclusion initiatives as part of my role at Sledgehammer Games, and I have written more articles and given more talks on this topic than I can even count anymore.

I have studied many forms of marginalisation because to work in diversity requires us to think intersectionally, but I started out looking at representations of queerness. Because of this (as well as my own bisexuality), Pride Month holds a special place in my heart.

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Categories: Video Games

'We've Bought the Wrong Satellites': UK Investment In OneWeb Baffles Experts

Slashdot - Sat, 27/06/2020 - 09:00
AmiMoJo writes: "The UK government's plan to invest hundreds of millions of pounds in a satellite broadband company has been described as 'nonsensical' by experts, who say the company doesn't even make the right type of satellite the country needs after Brexit," reports The Guardian. "The investment in OneWeb is intended to mitigate against the UK losing access to the EU's Galileo satellite navigation system. But OneWeb -- in which the UK will own a 20% stake following the investment -- currently operates a completely different type of satellite network from that typically used to run such navigation systems." OneWeb is building a global satellite internet delivery platform similar to Starlink, and plans to piggyback a British navigation system on the satellites. But the satellites will be in low Earth orbit at 12,000km altitude, compared to other navigation systems at 20,000km. "The fundamental starting point is, yes, we've bought the wrong satellites," said Dr Bleddyn Bowen, a space policy expert at the University of Leicester. "It's bolting an unproven technology on to a mega-constellation that's designed to do something else. It's a tech and business gamble." OneWeb filed for bankruptcy in March.

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A Massive Saharan Dust Plume Is Moving Into the Southeast US

Slashdot - Sat, 27/06/2020 - 05:30
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: A hot desert wind is carrying a massive cloud of Saharan dust into the Southern United States this week. Dust plumes from the Sahara routinely blow westward across the Atlantic at this time of year, but this event is a doozy -- by some measures, the biggest in decades. And a second plume appears to be forming about a week behind the big one. Across the southeastern US, from the Gulf Coast to the Carolinas and potentially as far north as Indianapolis and Cincinnati, dust effects will likely be visible in the coming days. Trillions of dust grains will reflect sunlight in every direction, creating milky white skies. The dusty haze reflects some sunshine back to space, cooling the surface a bit where the plume is thickest. Longer waves of red and orange light tend to penetrate the dusty haze, so sunrises and sunsets are likely to be especially beautiful. On the downside, where the plume mingles with showers or thunderstorms, downdrafts may carry desert dust to Earth's surface. This will impair air quality and could trigger allergic reactions and asthma attacks. The more dust reaches an area, the more pronounced the effects will be. Scott Denning, climate scientist and professor of atmospheric science at Colorado State University, goes on to describe what causes these plumes to form.

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Renewable Energy Breaks UK Record In First Quarter of 2020

Slashdot - Sat, 27/06/2020 - 04:03
Renewable energy made up almost half of Britain's electricity generation in the first three months of the year, with a surge in wind power helping to set a new record for clean energy. The Guardian reports: The government's official data has revealed that renewable energy made up 47% of the UK's electricity generation in the first three months of the year, smashing the previous quarterly record of 39% set last year. The government's renewable energy data includes electricity from the UK's windfarms, solar panels and hydro power plants as well as bioenergy generated by burning wood chips instead of coal. The "substantial increase" in the UK's total renewable energy output was chiefly driven by a growth in electricity generated by solar panels and windfarms which climbed by more than a third over the last year, according to the government's energy analysts. The report added that the start up of new windfarms combined with the UK's unusually wet and windy weather at the start of the year -- particularly storms Ciara, Dennis and Jorge -- helped to generate record wind power generation. Offshore windfarms powered the largest increase in renewable energy in the first quarter of the year, climbing by 53% compared with the previous year, while onshore wind generation grew by a fifth. In total, wind power generated 30% of the UK's electricity in the first quarter, beating the previous record of 22.3% set in the final months of 2019.

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Rosetta 2 is Apple's Key To Making the ARM Transition Less Painful

Slashdot - Sat, 27/06/2020 - 03:25
At WWDC 2020 earlier this week, Apple announced that it's moving Macs away from Intel processors to its own silicon, based on ARM architecture. To help ease the transition, the company announced Rosetta 2, a translation process that allows users to run apps that contain x86_64 instructions on Apple silicon. The Verge reports: Rosetta 2 essentially "translates" instructions that were written for Intel processors into commands that Apple's chips can understand. Developers won't need to make any changes to their old apps; they'll just work. (The original Rosetta was released in 2006 to facilitate Apple's transition from PowerPC to Intel. Apple has also stated that it will support x86 Macs "for years to come," as far as OS updates are concerned. The company shifted from PowerPC to Intel chips in 2006, but ditched support for the former in 2009; OS X Snow Leopard was Intel-only.) You don't, as a user, interact with Rosetta; it does its work behind-the-scenes. "Rosetta 2 is mostly there to minimize the impact on end-users and their experience when they buy a new Mac with Apple Silicon," says Angela Yu, founder of the software-development school App Brewery. "If Rosetta 2 does its job, your average user should not notice its existence." There's one difference you might perceive, though: speed. Programs that ran under the original Rosetta typically ran slower than those running natively on Intel, since the translator needed time to interpret the code. Early benchmarks found that popular PowerPC applications, such as Photoshop and Office, were running at less than half their native speed on the Intel systems. We'll have to wait and see if apps under Rosetta 2 take similar performance hits. But there are a couple reasons to be optimistic. First, the original Rosetta converted every instruction in real-time, as it executed them. Rosetta 2 can convert an application right at installation time, effectively creating an ARM-optimized version of the app before you've opened it. (It can also translate on the fly for apps that can't be translated ahead of time, such as browser, Java, and Javascript processes, or if it encounters other new code that wasn't translated at install time.) With Rosetta 2 frontloading a bulk of the work, we may see better performance from translated apps. The report notes that the engine won't support everything. "It's not compatible with some programs, including virtual machine apps, which you might use to run Windows or another operating system on your Mac, or to test out new software without impacting the rest of your system," reports The Verge. "(You also won't be able to run Windows in Boot Camp mode on ARM Macs. Microsoft only licenses the ARM version of Windows 10 to PC manufacturers.) Rosetta 2 also can't translate kernel extensions, which some programs leverage to perform tasks that macOS doesn't have a native feature for (similar to drivers in Windows)."

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Covid-19 Killed the Era of 'Big' Flying

Slashdot - Sat, 27/06/2020 - 02:45
COVID-19 has shattered the aviation industry, with nations closing their borders and banning all but essential travel. A world where people could hop from country to country is now one where empty planes travel to maintain contractual obligations. Major carriers, including American, IAG, Delta and Lufthansa have all asked for government bailouts. From a report: One airline that will receive a substantial amount of taxpayer cash is Air France-KLM, which will get around $17 billion worth of help. That figure comes with conditions, including that the Franco-Dutch conglomerate cuts its CO2 emissions and buys gear from the France-based Airbus. Airbus is, of course, one of the world's two major aircraft manufacturers, the other being the US-based Boeing. But, even now, it's not clear that any quantity of cash will be enough to see flying return to the levels seen in 2019. Whatever we were used to, in terms of cost, convenience and experience, it's not going to be the same for a while. Just last week, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) said that only 45 percent of travelers asked intended to fly "within a few months of the pandemic subsiding." Perhaps the biggest casualty of COVID-19 so far has been the Airbus A380 and the flying it represented. This "superjumbo" jet, competition for the Boeing 747, was designed to offer mass transit in the skies, to convey huge volumes of people around the world in its double-decker cabin and a potential capacity of more than 850. Work on the A380 began in the early '90s, with the first vessel entering service in 2007, and it's instantly recognizable. Less a plane and more like a bus, it hauls people between major hub airports, where they get a single-aisle craft to their destination. The idea of air travel, back at the A380's genesis, was that you'd fly to, say, JFK, and then get an A380 to Cape Town, Paris or Shanghai. A number of carriers have A380s, but it's become synonymous with Emirates, which has a staggering 115 of the craft in its fleet. But despite the plane's relative youth, launching just over a decade ago, the virus has hastened the A380's demise. Airbus announced last year it would stop manufacturing the plane, and according to Bloomberg, even Emirates, its biggest booster, no longer wants its remaining deliveries.

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Mobilewalla Used Cellphone Data To Estimate the Demographics of Protesters

Slashdot - Sat, 27/06/2020 - 02:02
An anonymous reader quotes a report from BuzzFeed News: On the weekend of May 29, thousands of people marched, sang, grieved, and chanted, demanding an end to police brutality and the defunding of police departments in the aftermath of the police killings of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor. They marched en masse in cities like Minneapolis, New York, Los Angeles, and Atlanta, empowered by their number and the assumed anonymity of the crowd. And they did so completely unaware that a tech company was using location data harvested from their cellphones to predict their race, age, and gender and where they lived. Just over two weeks later, that company, Mobilewalla, released a report titled "George Floyd Protester Demographics: Insights Across 4 Major US Cities." In 60 pie charts, the document details what percentage of protesters the company believes were male or female, young adult (18-34); middle-aged 3554, or older (55+); and "African-American," "Caucasian/Others," "Hispanic," or "Asian-American." "African American males made up the majority of protesters in the four observed cities vs. females," Mobilewalla claimed. "Men vs. women in Atlanta (61% vs. 39%), in Los Angeles (65% vs. 35%), in Minneapolis (54% vs. 46%) and in New York (59% vs. 41%)." The company analyzed data from 16,902 devices at protests -- including exactly 8,152 devices in New York, 4,527 in Los Angeles, 2,357 in Minneapolis, and 1,866 in Atlanta. It's unclear how accurate Mobilewalla's analysis actually is. But Mobilewalla's report is another revelation from a wild west of obscure companies with untold amounts of sensitive information about individuals -- including where they go and what their political allegiances may be. There are no federal laws in place to prevent this information from being abused. Mobilewalla's privacy policy says that people have the right to opt out of certain uses of their personal information. But it also says, "Even if you opt out, we, our Clients and third parties may still collect and use information regarding your activities on the Services, Properties, websites and/or applications and/or information from advertisements for other legal purposes as described herein." Mobilewalla CEO Anindya Datta said the company didn't prepare the report for law enforcement or a public agency, but rather to satisfy its own employees' curiosity about what its vast trove of unregulated data could reveal about the demonstrators. He added that the company doesn't plan to include information about whether a person attended a protest to its clients, or to law enforcement agencies.

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Alphabet Reportedly Buying Smart Glasses Maker North

Slashdot - Sat, 27/06/2020 - 01:20
According to The Globe and Mail, Alphabet is rumored to be acquiring smart glasses maker North for $180 million. 9to5Google reports: This comes after North in December stopped selling Focals to focus on launching second-generation smart glasses sometime in 2020. "Focals 2.0" has been teased over the past several months with North claiming that they would be the "most significant product introduction to date in the category." A "lighter" and "sleeker" design would have a "10x display," while miniaturizing the technology by 40%. Sales of the first-generation device are described as "minuscule" in today's report: "One person close to the sales operations says it's unlikely North sold many more than 1,000 pairs. Its only retail stores, in Toronto and Brooklyn, N.Y., often went days without a single sale." In ending sales, North has not been bringing in any revenue, and the company is running out of money even after slashing monthly spending in half to $3 million. Despite taking on additional investment and loans, North is said to have started looking for a buyer earlier this year.

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Lyft Settles With Justice Department Over Disability Lawsuit

Slashdot - Sat, 27/06/2020 - 00:40
Lyft has settled with the Justice Department in a lawsuit alleging the company discriminated against customers with disabilities. Engadget reports: Now, drivers will be required to help fold and stow wheelchairs and walkers for customers. The rideshare company has also been ordered to educate its drivers as well as pay complainants and a $40,000 civil penalty. Lyft will pay various amounts in damages to the complainants, including $30,000 to J.H. It's been ordered to modify its wheelchair policy to specify that "drivers are required to assist with the stowing of foldable or collapsible mobility devices used by individuals with disabilities, such as wheelchairs, scooters, and walkers." The company will make a few changes to better educate drivers on the wheelchair policy, like sending quarterly reminders of the policy to drivers and creating a new educational video about the policy. For the next three years, Lyft will give the Justice Department biannual written reports on what it's doing to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

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California City Bans Predictive Policing In US First

Slashdot - Sat, 27/06/2020 - 00:00
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Reuters: As officials mull steps to tackle police brutality and racism, California's Santa Cruz has become the first U.S. city to ban predictive policing, which digital rights experts said could spark similar moves across the country. "Understanding how predictive policing and facial recognition can be disportionately biased against people of color, we officially banned the use of these technologies in the city of Santa Cruz," Mayor Justin Cummings said on Wednesday. His administration will work with the police to "help eliminate racism in policing", the seaside city's first male African-American mayor said on his Facebook page, following a vote on Tuesday evening. Used by police across the United States for almost a decade, predictive policing relies on algorithms to interpret police records, analyzing arrest or parole data to send officers to target chronic offenders, or identifying places where crime may occur. But critics says it reinforces racist patterns of policing -- low-income, ethnic minority neighborhoods have historically been overpoliced so the data shows them as crime hotspots, leading to the deployment of more police to those areas.

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As Advertisers Revolt, Facebook Commits To Flagging 'Newsworthy' Political Speech That Violates Policy

Slashdot - Fri, 26/06/2020 - 23:24
As advertisers pull away from Facebook to protest the social networking giant's hands-off approach to misinformation and hate speech, the company is instituting a number of stronger policies to woo them back. From a report: In a livestreamed segment of the company's weekly all-hands meeting, CEO Mark Zuckerberg recapped some of the steps Facebook is already taking, and announced new measures to fight voter suppression and misinformation -- although they amount to things that other social media platforms like Twitter have already enacted and enforced in more aggressive ways. At the heart of the policy changes is an admission that the company will continue to allow politicians and public figures to disseminate hate speech that does, in fact, violate the Facebook's own guidelines -- but it will add a label to denote they're remaining on the platform because of their "newsworthy" nature. It's a watered down version of the more muscular stance that Twitter has taken to limit the ability of its network to amplify hate speech or statements that incite violence. [...] Zuckerberg's remarks came days of advertisers -- most recently Unilever and Verizon -- announced that they're going to pull their money from Facebook as part the #StopHateforProfit campaign organized by civil rights groups.

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House Democrats Pass DC Statehood Bill

Slashdot - Fri, 26/06/2020 - 22:45
House Democrats approved a bill to admit Washington, DC, as a state on Friday, marking the first time either chamber of Congress has advanced a DC statehood measure. From a report: The bill, introduced by DC's nonvoting House member, Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, would shrink the federal capital to a small area encompassing the White House, Capitol building, Supreme Court, and other federal buildings along the National Mall. The rest of the city would become the 51st state, named the Washington, Douglass Commonwealth after abolitionist Frederick Douglass. The bill passed with a vote of 232-180. Rep. Collin Peterson of Minnesota was the only Democrat to join Republicans in voting against it. Independent Rep. Justin Amash of Michigan also voted no. The bill would grant DC two senators and make the existing sole House representative a voting member. It is unlikely to gain traction in the Republican-held Senate, however, and the White House said (PDF) this week that President Donald Trump would veto the bill if it came to his desk. Proponents of making DC a state also point to the area's large population, which surpasses the populations of Wyoming and Vermont. As of June 2019, DC had more than 705,000 residents, according to estimates from the US Census Bureau. To become law, the bill's supporters argue it would only have to pass both chambers of Congress with a simple majority and then be signed by the President. They say the legislation's strategy of resizing the capital area would sidestep constitutional questions about making the rest of DC a state. But Republicans who oppose DC statehood maintain that adding the district as a state would require a constitutional amendment.

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'Google Blew a Ten-Year Lead'

Slashdot - Fri, 26/06/2020 - 22:05
An anonymous reader shares a column: Back when there were rumors of Google building an operating system, I thought "Lol." Then I watched then-PM Sundar Pichai announce Chrome OS. My heart raced. It was perfect. I got my email through Gmail, I wrote documents on Docs, I listened to Pandora, I viewed photos on TheFacebook. Why did I need all of Windows Vista? In 2010, I predicted that by 2020 Chrome OS would be the most popular desktop OS in the world. It was fast, lightweight, and $0. "Every Windows and OS X app will be re-built for the browser!" I thought. Outlook > Gmail. Excel > Sheets. Finder > Dropbox. Photoshop > Figma. Terminal > Repl.it. All of your files would be accessible by whoever you wanted, wherever you wanted, all the time. It was obvious. Revolutionary. I haven't installed MSFT Office on a machine since 2009. Sheets and Docs have been good enough for me. The theoretical unlimited computing power and collaboration features meant Google Docs was better than Office (and free!). Then something happened at Google. I'm not sure what. But they stopped innovating on cloud software. Docs and Sheets haven't changed in a decade. Google Drive remains impossible to navigate. Sharing is complicated. Sheets freezes up. I can't easily interact with a Sheets API (I've tried!). Docs still shows page breaks by default! WTF! Even though I have an iPhone and a MacBook, I've been married to Google services. I browse Chrome. I use Gmail. I get directions and lookup restaurants on Maps. I'm a YouTube addict. Yet I've been ungluing myself from Google so far this year. Not because of Google-is-reading-my-emails-and-tracking-every-keystroke reasons, but because I like other software so much more that it's worth switching. At WWDC, Apple shared Safari stats for macOS Big Sur. It reminded me how much Chrome makes my machine go WHURRRRRR. [...] I've given up on Google Docs. I can never find the documents Andy shares with me. The formatting is tired and stuck in the you-might-print-this-out paradigm. Notion is a much better place to write and brainstorm with people. The mobile Google results page is so cluttered that I switched my iPhone's default search to DuckDuckGo. The results are a tad worse, but I'm never doing heavy-duty searches on the go. And now I don't have to scroll past 6 ads to get the first result. DuckDuckGo's privacy is an added bonus.

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Doom Eternal's latest update adds new Battlemode map, Doom Classic filter, more

Eurogamer - Fri, 26/06/2020 - 22:02

Doom Eternal's latest update has arrived on Xbox One, PS4, and PC, introducing a range of new features including a brand-new Battlemode map and, for the aesthetes in the house, a selection of visual filters to fancy up your screen.

On the 2v1 Battlemode front, there's the aforementioned new arena, known as Torment, which features a deserted UAC outpost, abandoned after the Slayer prevented Hell's invasion of Earth. "The Titans, once used as research specimens," says id Software, "remain eternal prisoners of this unholy excavation."

Players can also expect a range of latency improvements for Battlemode as part of today's Doom Eternal Update 2.

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