news

Microsoft Exchange Server Vulnerabilities Mitigations – updated March 6, 2021

Microsoft Security Response Blog - Sat, 06/03/2021 - 00:01
Microsoft previously blogged our strong recommendation that customers upgrade their on-premises Exchange environments to the latest supported version. For customers that are not able to quickly apply updates, we are providing the following alternative mitigation techniques to help Microsoft Exchange customers who need more time to patch their deployments and are willing to make risk …

Microsoft Exchange Server Vulnerabilities Mitigations – updated March 6, 2021 Read More »

Categories: IT

Binding of Isaac dev's Legend of Bum-bo gets free The Lost expansion

Eurogamer - Sat, 06/03/2021 - 00:00

Binding of Isaac creator Edmund McMillen's poopy puzzle-based deck-builder The Legend of Bum-bo has just received a free expansion, introducing a raft of new content alongside some much needed fixes and quality of life improvements.

Although ostensibly a prequel to The Binding of Isaac, Bum-bo is a notably different proposition, building its randomised dungeon-crawling action around turn-based combat with a match-4-style puzzle system at its core.

Unfortunately, despite some solid design and eye-catching presentation, Bum-bo arrived in a bit of a state when it released in 2019, and plenty of issue still lingered when, shortly after release, McMillen went radio silent for almost a year.

Read more

Categories: Video Games

China's 'Sharp Eyes' Program Aims To Surveil 100% of Public Space

Slashdot - Fri, 05/03/2021 - 23:25
schwit1 shares a report: One of China's largest and most pervasive surveillance networks got its start in a small county about seven hours north of Shanghai. In 2013, the local government in Pingyi County began installing tens of thousands of security cameras across urban and rural areas -- more than 28,500 in total by 2016. Even the smallest villages had at least six security cameras installed, according to state media. Those cameras weren't just monitored by police and automated facial recognition algorithms. Through special TV boxes installed in their homes, local residents could watch live security footage and press a button to summon police if they saw anything amiss. The security footage could also be viewed on smartphones. In 2015 the Chinese government announced that a similar program would be rolled out across China, with a particular focus on remote and rural towns. It was called the "Xueliang Project," or Sharp Eyes, a reference to a quote from communist China's former revolutionary leader Mao Zedong who once wrote that "the people have sharp eyes" when looking out for neighbors not living up to communist values. China's next five-year plan, which covers 2021 to 2025 (PDF), places specific emphasis on giving social governance to local municipalities via the grid system, as well as building out even more security projects, to "strengthen construction of the prevention and control system for public security." This means the future of China's surveillance apparatus likely looks a lot like Sharp Eyes: More power and social control given to local governments, so neighbors watch neighbors.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Disgaea 6: Defiance of Destiny gets June release date on Switch

Eurogamer - Fri, 05/03/2021 - 22:51

Disgaea 6: Defiance of Destiny, the latest entry in developer Nippon Ichi Software's cult favourite tactics game, will be heading to Switch on 29th June.

It's been six year since Disgaea 5 debuted on PlayStation 4 (it's made its way to Switch and PC since then), and Disgaea 6 arrives with a few notable changes, the most immediately obvious being a new art style that trades the appealing 2D character sprites of old for 3D models.

Disgaea 6 follows the adventures of new protagonist Zet, a teenage zombie on a quest to defeat a powerful god, and it's his unique ability - known as Super Reincarnation - that ushers in one of the game's most significant mechanical additions.

Read more

Categories: Video Games

Samsung and Mastercard To Pilot Biometric Payments Card in South Korea

Slashdot - Fri, 05/03/2021 - 22:45
Samsung Electronics and Mastercard have partnered to pilot a biometric card that uses a built-in fingerprint sensor to authorise in-store transactions. From a report: The partnership, confirmed through a memorandum of understanding, will see the companies develop a card using Samsung's System LSI Business' new security chipset, which Samsung claimed has integrated "key discrete chips" to improve efficiency. "Drawing from our strong security solution background in various applications such as passports, credit cards, and mobile devices, we will work with Mastercard and Samsung Card to create an environment where consumers can use payment card services with an added peace of mind," Samsung Electronics vice president Harry Cho said. The card will be able to be used at any Mastercard in-store payment terminal, they said. It will not require PIN or signature authorisations when transactions are made, the companies added. The pilot biometric card will be rolled out in South Korea later this year, with the adoption of the solution to be a gradual process, Samsung said. The rollout will first start with corporate credit cards that have more frequent international transactions.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

India Threatens Jail for Facebook, WhatsApp and Twitter Employees

Slashdot - Fri, 05/03/2021 - 22:05
India's government has threatened to jail employees of Facebook, its WhatsApp unit and Twitter as it seeks to quash political protests and gain far-reaching powers over discourse on foreign-owned tech platforms, WSJ reported Friday, citing people familiar with the warnings. From the report: The warnings are in direct response to the tech companies' reluctance to comply with data and takedown requests from the government related to protests by Indian farmers that have made international headlines, the people say. At least some of the written warnings cite specific, India-based employees at risk of arrest if the companies don't comply, according to two of the people. The threats mark an escalation of India's efforts to pressure U.S. tech companies at a moment when those companies are looking to the world's second-most-populous nation for growth in the coming years. Some of the government's requests for data involve WhatsApp, which is hugely popular in India and promises users encrypted communication, unable to be read by outside parties.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Students Are Easily Cheating 'State-of-the-Art' Test Proctoring Tech

Slashdot - Fri, 05/03/2021 - 21:25
Students are using HDMI cables and hidden phones to cheat on exams administered through invasive proctoring software like Proctorio. From a report: "I've taken online exams cheating and not cheating and they are just about as stressful anyways so fuck it, am I right?" That's what one French student who had cheated on multiple remote exams administered through the popular digital proctoring software Proctorio told Motherboard in a voice message. With the COVID-19 pandemic continuing to rage around the globe and no quick end to remote learning in sight, many students have found themselves taking exams under the watch of proctoring software like Proctorio, which surveils students through algorithmic systems that, among other things, detect eye movements, track keyboard strokes, and monitor audio inputs. Universities sometimes shell out thousands of dollars per exam for Proctorio, which helps at least give the impression that academic integrity is being maintained during remote learning. But for some students using Proctorio and other online proctoring services is invasive and anxiety-inducing, subjecting them and their surroundings to unwarranted surveillance that is difficult to refuse without their studies being negatively affected. Yet, despite the fact that popular online proctoring platforms like Proctorio claim that they use "state-of-the-art technology" and "ensure the total learning integrity of every assessment, every time," students are cheating on their exams anyway. Motherboard spoke to 10 university students from various countries who claimed to have cheated on exams where Proctorio was in place. While their motivations and techniques varied, there was one common denominator: none of them got caught. The relative ease with which the students cheated, and the fact that each student could point to multiple peers who had done the same (one American student estimated that 90 percent of her class had cheated), raises the question of how effective online proctoring software like Proctorio actually is -- and whether it is worth the hefty price tag or the invasion of privacy. "With Proctorio obviously you need to show yourself and your room with the computer's webcam," one Dutch student who had helped a friend cheat on a multiple choice exam told Motherboard. "My friend put a phone on a stand on his keyboard so it couldn't be seen during the room and desk sweep. Then we FaceTimed with me at the other end," she continued. "The phone was at a slant so he could see me and I could see the exam. Then I would just hold up a flashcard with a, b, c, or d." Another French student used a 10-meter HDMI cable that ran from his laptop to a TV screen in another room that mirrored his screen. His friend would then look up the exam answers and send it via WhatsApp to his phone, which was also on the keyboard and out of sight of the webcam. "Worked perfectly and got a good grade," he said.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

US Says John McAfee Indicted Over Fraudulent Cryptocurrency Schemes

Slashdot - Fri, 05/03/2021 - 20:43
John McAfee, creator of the eponymous anti-virus software, has been indicted in Manhattan federal court on fraud and money laundering conspiracy crimes, stemming from two schemes concerning the fraudulent promotion to investors of cryptocurrencies, officials said on Friday. From a report: McAfee and his bodyguard Jimmy Gale Watson Jr were charged for a scheme to exploit McAfee's large Twitter following by publicly touting cryptocurrency offerings and digital tokens that they later sold once prices rose on the promotions, according to the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission. McAfee is being detained in Spain on separate criminal charges filed by the Justice Department's tax division, the department said. Watson, an executive adviser of McAfee's so-called cryptocurrency team, was arrested on Thursday night, the Justice Department said.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

French Stargazers Hunt for Meteorite the Size of Apricot

Slashdot - Fri, 05/03/2021 - 20:05
France's ranks of amateur astronomers have been urged to help find an apricot-size meteorite that fell to Earth last weekend in the south-west of the country. From a report: The rock, estimated to weigh 150 grams (just over five ounces), was captured plunging through the atmosphere by cameras at an astronomy education facility in Mauraux, and landed at exactly 10.43pm on Saturday near Aiguillon, about 100km (62 miles) from Bordeaux. The site is part of the Vigie-Ciel (Sky Watch) project of around 100 cameras in the Fireball Recovery and InterPlanetary Observation Network (FRIPON), which aims to detect and collect the 10 or so meteorites that fall on France each year. "Meteorites are relics of the solar system's creation, with the benefit of never being exposed to the elements," said Mickael Wilmart of the A Ciel Ouvert (Open Sky) astronomy education association that operates the Mauraux observatory. "A fresh meteorite like this, which fell just a few days ago, hasn't been altered by the Earth's environment and therefore contains very precious information for scientists," he said.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

'Hovering Ship' Photographed Off Cornish Coast By Walker

Slashdot - Fri, 05/03/2021 - 19:25
Images of what appears to be a hovering ship have been captured as the result of a rare optical illusion off the coast of England. From a report: David Morris took a photo of the ship near Falmouth, Cornwall. BBC meteorologist David Braine said the "superior mirage" occurred because of "special atmospheric conditions that bend light". He said the illusion is common in the Arctic, but can appear "very rarely" in the UK during winter. Mr Morris said he was "stunned" after capturing the picture while looking out to sea from the hamlet of Gillan. Mr Braine said: "Superior mirages occur because of the weather condition known as a temperature inversion, where cold air lies close to the sea with warmer air above it. "Since cold air is denser than warm air, it bends light towards the eyes of someone standing on the ground or on the coast, changing how a distant object appears.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Employment Rose Among Those in Free Money Experiment

Slashdot - Fri, 05/03/2021 - 18:45
After getting $500 per month for two years without rules on how to spend it, 125 people in California paid off debt, got full-time jobs and reported lower rates of anxiety and depression, according to a study released this week. From a report: The program in the Northern California city of Stockton was the highest-profile experiment in the U.S. of a universal basic income, where everyone gets a guaranteed amount per month for free. Announced by former Mayor Michael Tubbs with great fanfare in 2017, the idea quickly gained momentum once it became a major part of Andrew Yang's 2020 campaign for president. Supporters say a guaranteed income can alleviate the stress and anxiety of people living in poverty while giving them the financial security needed to find good jobs and avoid debt. But critics argue free money would eliminate the incentive to work, creating a society dependent on the state. Tubbs, who at 26 was elected Stockton's first Black mayor in 2016 after endorsements from Oprah Winfrey and Barack Obama, wanted to put those claims to the test. Stockton was an ideal place, given its proximity to Silicon Valley and the eagerness of the state's tech titans to fund the experiment as they grapple with how to prepare for job losses that could come with automation and artificial intelligence. The Stockton Economic Empowerment Demonstration launched in February 2019, selecting a group of 125 people who lived in census tracts at or below the city's median household income of $46,033. The program did not use tax dollars, but was financed by private donations, including a nonprofit led by Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

MicroStrategy Buys Another 205 Bitcoins, Now Owns 91,064 Bitcoins

Slashdot - Fri, 05/03/2021 - 18:05
Business intelligence firm MicroStrategy disclosed on Friday that it just spent $10 million in cash to buy 205 bitcoins. From a report: The enterprise software and bitcoin holder said it paid an average price of $48,888 for each bitcoin, including fees. The company said as of March 5, it holds about 91,064 bitcoins, which were acquired at total spend of $2.20 billion at an average price of about $24,119 per bitcoin. MicroStrategy's stock has soared 96.9% over the past three months through Thursday, while bitcoin prices have rocketed 156.4% and the S&P 500 has gained 1.9%.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Microsoft's $10 Billion Pentagon Deal at Risk Amid Amazon Fight

Slashdot - Fri, 05/03/2021 - 17:36
Microsoft is in danger of losing a contract to provide $10 billion of cloud computing services to the Pentagon, a deal the government has threatened to scrap altogether after years of legal squabbling. From a report: The U.S. Defense Department said it will reconsider the controversial procurement if a federal judge declines to dismiss Amazon's allegations that former President Donald Trump's meddling cost the company the winner-take-all contract. That means the fate of a cloud project the Pentagon considers critical for its war fighters may rest in the hands of the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, which could soon issue a ruling on Amazon's accusations. The Pentagon said last month it would take too long to prove in court that its decision to award Microsoft the lucrative cloud deal wasn't unduly influenced by the White House. If the judge allows Amazon to argue its bias claims in the case, the government may decide to stop fighting. "If the court denies the government's motion we will most likely be facing an even longer litigation process," Pentagon spokesman John Kirby said at a press conference late last month. "The DOD Chief Information Officer will reassess the strategy going forward." The warning is another twist in a contentious process that has involved years of legal challenges, behind-the-scenes lobbying and a public relations campaign by technology rivals to unseat Amazon as the original front-runner for the cloud contract when it was unveiled in 2018. More than a year after Microsoft was named the winner, the Defense Department is still fighting to execute the Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure cloud -- or JEDI, an acronym intended to evoke "Star Wars" imagery -- to serve as the primary data repository for military services worldwide. The deal is worth $10 billion over a decade. There are signs the Pentagon is already moving on. The Defense Department is talking up its other cloud contracts beyond JEDI, and some of the program's biggest cheerleaders have left the department, leaving new leaders to make decisions on a procurement they inherited from the Trump administration. Even Microsoft executives are trumpeting all the other work the company plans to keep doing for the Defense Department, in the event that its image-boosting JEDI deal goes south.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

A Leading Critic of Big Tech Joins the White House

Slashdot - Fri, 05/03/2021 - 16:44
President Biden on Friday named Tim Wu, a Columbia University law professor, to the National Economic Council on Friday as a special assistant to the president for technology and competition policy, putting one of the most outspoken critics of Big Tech's power into the administration. From a report: The appointment of Mr. Wu, 48, who is widely supported by progressive Democrats and antimonopoly groups, suggests that the administration plans to take on the size and influence of companies like Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google, including working with Congress on legislation to strengthen antitrust laws. During his campaign, Mr. Biden said he would be open to breaking up tech companies. That confrontational approach toward the tech industry would be a continuation of the one taken by the Trump administration. Late last year, federal and state regulators sued Facebook and Google, accusing them of antitrust violations. The regulators continue to investigate claims that Amazon and Apple unfairly squash competition. Mr. Biden has also expressed skepticism toward social media companies and the legal shield known as Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. He told The New York Times editorial board in January 2020 that Section 230 "should be revoked, immediately." The tech companies have fought vigorously against new antitrust laws and regulations, building out some of the most potent lobbying forces in Washington to push back. Mr. Wu has warned about the consequences of too much power in the hands of a few companies and said the nation's economy resembled the Gilded Age of the late 1800s. "Extreme economic concentration yields gross inequality and material suffering, feeding the appetite for nationalistic and extremist leadership," Mr. Wu wrote in his 2018 book, "The Curse of Bigness: Antitrust in the New Gilded Age." "Most visible in our daily lives is the great power of the tech platforms, especially Google, Facebook and Amazon," he added. Wu is best known for advocacy against powerful telecom companies and for coining the term "net neutrality," the regulatory philosophy that consumers should get equal access to all content on the internet.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Outriders first look: 60fps is the key upgrade for PS5 and Xbox Series consoles

Eurogamer - Fri, 05/03/2021 - 16:32

Imagine the cover-shooting mechanics of Gears of War combined with four unique superhero classes and an open world layout with up to three player squads - and basically, that's Outriders. Developed by People Can Fly, the demo is enjoying plenty of attention at the moment - allowing players to test out the first chapter, then roll that progress into the full game due early next month. Within this advance sampler, users get a slice of the story, some side-missions, along with a chance to check out some fiery superpowers. All are hugely satisfying in their own right and combat is fast and dynamic, but it's fair to say that the experience varies significantly by the platform. We checked out the game on Xbox One X for a taster of the last-gen experience, then moved on to the new wave of consoles to see what's what - and the results are intriguing.

The key difference between the generations is very simple - frame-rate. It's worth pointing out here that Outriders isn't a straight 'back compat plus' upgrade as far as we can tell, it is definitely a native PlayStation 5 application, but the overall effect looks pretty similar in that a 30fps experience on the last-gen machines has the frame-rate limiter removed, allowing what is effectively the same game to run at up to 60 frames per second. Xbox One X is the most powerful machine of the prior era, and Outriders is certainly an impressive looking experience: Unreal Engine 4's temporal upscaler delivers a 4K output, but native resolution rendering is dynamic - 1728p at the minimum, 1944p on the maximum.

30fps is indeed the target for the last-gen machines, but the action is not as smooth as it should be: improper frame-pacing sees new frames delivered at 16ms, 33ms and 50ms intervals for the most part, so there is a consistency problem there. On top of that are genuine performance drops, one to two second stutters at points and obvious texture pop-in. However, the scope and quality of the visuals looks very close to what the new wave of consoles are delivering.

Read more

Categories: Video Games

Google's FLoC Is a Terrible Idea

Slashdot - Fri, 05/03/2021 - 16:00
Earlier this week, Google said that after it finishes phasing out third-party cookies over the next year or so, it won't introduce other forms of identifiers to track individuals as they browse across the web. Instead, the search giant plans to use something called Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoC), which the company says has shown promising results. In a deep-dive, EFF has outlined several issues surrounding the usage of FLoC. The introductory excerpt follows: The third-party cookie is dying, and Google is trying to create its replacement. No one should mourn the death of the cookie as we know it. For more than two decades, the third-party cookie has been the lynchpin in a shadowy, seedy, multi-billion dollar advertising-surveillance industry on the Web; phasing out tracking cookies and other persistent third-party identifiers is long overdue. However, as the foundations shift beneath the advertising industry, its biggest players are determined to land on their feet. Google is leading the charge to replace third-party cookies with a new suite of technologies to target ads on the Web. And some of its proposals show that it hasn't learned the right lessons from the ongoing backlash to the surveillance business model. This post will focus on one of those proposals, Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoC), which is perhaps the most ambitious -- and potentially the most harmful. FLoC is meant to be a new way to make your browser do the profiling that third-party trackers used to do themselves: in this case, boiling down your recent browsing activity into a behavioral label, and then sharing it with websites and advertisers. The technology will avoid the privacy risks of third-party cookies, but it will create new ones in the process. It may also exacerbate many of the worst non-privacy problems with behavioral ads, including discrimination and predatory targeting. Google's pitch to privacy advocates is that a world with FLoC (and other elements of the "privacy sandbox") will be better than the world we have today, where data brokers and ad-tech giants track and profile with impunity. But that framing is based on a false premise that we have to choose between "old tracking" and "new tracking." It's not either-or. Instead of re-inventing the tracking wheel, we should imagine a better world without the myriad problems of targeted ads. We stand at a fork in the road. Behind us is the era of the third-party cookie, perhaps the Web's biggest mistake. Ahead of us are two possible futures. In one, users get to decide what information to share with each site they choose to interact with. No one needs to worry that their past browsing will be held against them -- or leveraged to manipulate them -- when they next open a tab. In the other, each user's behavior follows them from site to site as a label, inscrutable at a glance but rich with meaning to those in the know. Their recent history, distilled into a few bits, is "democratized" and shared with dozens of nameless actors that take part in the service of each web page. Users begin every interaction with a confession: here's what I've been up to this week, please treat me accordingly. Users and advocates must reject FLoC and other misguided attempts to reinvent behavioral targeting. We implore Google to abandon FLoC and redirect its effort towards building a truly user-friendly Web.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Flutter 2: Google's Toolkit For Developers Takes a Big Step Forward

Slashdot - Fri, 05/03/2021 - 15:00
An anonymous reader quotes a report from ZDNet: Google has announced Flutter 2, a major upgrade to its framework for building user interfaces for mobile, the web and desktop. Flutter promises to allow developers to use the same codebase to build native apps for iOS, Android, Windows 10, macOS, and Linux and for the web on browsers including Chrome, Firefox, Safari or Edge. It can also be embedded in an IoT device with a screen, such as cars, TVs, and home appliances. The move to Flutter 2 promises to benefit the over 150,000 Flutter Android apps already available on the Play Store. Every app will get a free upgrade with Flutter 2 allowing developers to target desktop and web without rewriting them. Google apps now built with Flutter include Google Pay, Stadia and Google Nest Hub among others. Flutter 2 also brings production quality support for the web, with a focus on progressive web apps (PWAs) that behave like desktop apps, single page apps, and mobile apps on the web. Google has added a new CanvasKit-powered rendering engine built with WebAssembly. For mobile web apps, in recent months it's added autofill, control over address bar URLs and routing, and PWA manifests. For desktop browsers, it has added interactive scrollbars and keyboard shortcuts, increased the default content density in desktop modes, and added screen reader support for accessibility on Windows, macOS and ChromeOS. Google has been working with Ubuntu maker Canonical to bring Flutter to the desktop. Canonical will make Flutter the default choice for future desktop and mobile apps it creates. Microsoft is also releasing contributions to the Flutter engine that supports foldable Android devices, such as the Microsoft Surface Duo.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Apex Legends Collection Event brings Ring Fury playlist, Caustic Town Takeover

Eurogamer - Fri, 05/03/2021 - 14:17

Coinciding with the launch of Apex Legends on Switch, next week the battle royale is getting another Collection Event with a bunch of new cosmetics, a playlist called Ring Fury, and a Caustic Town Takeover. Yeah, I'm not totally sure I want to check out Caustic's idea of home renovations either.

Starting on 9th March and running until the 23rd, the Chaos Theory Collection Event brings a number of free earnable cosmetics, which largely seem to have an orangey-brown theme. You can earn 1000 points per day, with challenges that refresh daily and additional "stretch challenges" that give out unique badges if completed during the event.

Alongside the free stuff, there's also a bunch of premium skins that you'll have to purchase either with Apex Coins or Crafting Metals - or alternatively, through buying Event Apex Packs. If you really want to buy all 24 of these packs (something that in previous events has totalled over £100), you can unlock the new Bangalore heirloom - but this item will also become available through regular heirloom crafting (via Apex Packs) once the event is over.

Read more

Categories: Video Games

Pokémon Go Kanto Tour ticket holder bonuses live, briefly available to all

Eurogamer - Fri, 05/03/2021 - 14:07

Last night, Pokémon Go's Kanto Tour bonuses - designed to make up for the fact the game's ticketed event was available to people who hadn't paid - were released and accidentally also made available to people who hadn't paid.

This latest error was fixed within a couple of hours - the research questline and box of free remote raid passes disappearing for a while in the interim - but not before some players accessing it for free in Australia and New Zealand had claimed the bonuses already.

Writing on top fan reddit TheSilphRoad, some fans expressed exasperation at this latest slip-up - while others simply found it hilarious.

Read more

Categories: Video Games

What we've been playing

Eurogamer - Fri, 05/03/2021 - 14:00

Hello! Welcome back to our regular feature where we write a little bit about some of the games we've found ourselves playing over the last few days. This time: a strange map, a reminder of arcade brilliance, falling blocks, and a trip to the Hoenn region.

I've recently spent a lot of time in my local town for some reason and found there's something rather comforting about getting to know an area very well. The routes I can walk down with my eyes closed, the same faces at the same times, all walking the same dogs. A friend of mine and I recently started sending each other obscurely-angled phone snaps of somewhere in town for the other to guess. Usually we're able to. We make our own fun.

There's something of that to Carto, too, the brilliant top-down adventure game whose map you construct yourself. I started playing it on Xbox Game Pass this week, though it's available from other good platform stores also. About an hour in, finding myself hooked and unexpectedly engrossed in its story, I sat back and looked at the world map I'd created so far. The handful of tiles I'd been given made up a tiny space - I'd barely gone anywhere! - but I had swapped and rearranged and watched as new tiles appeared as if made out of hidden origami. And I knew each of those map tiles in detail.

Read more

Categories: Video Games
Syndicate content