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The road to Gran Turismo 7 - the evolution of Trial Mountain

Eurogamer - Wed, 01/07/2020 - 15:00

Since its inception Gran Turismo has always pushed the envelope for each new console. With the reveal of Gran Turismo 7 at Sony's recent PlayStation 5 event then, we have an exclusive that appears to live up to that reputation: both 4K resolution and 60fps are on display in the trailer, alongside taxing ray traced reflections. And yet despite the technical ambition, it's a true, classic circuit that's used to demonstrate it all: Trial Mountain. After its absence in Gran Turismo Sport on PS4, Trial Mountain's return shows the huge strides developer Polyphony Digital has taken. Not just in comparison to its last appearance with Gran Turismo 6 on PS3, but going all the way back to the original 1997 PlayStation game. Every numbered entry features this track, and so, it charts a clear path of technical evolution for the series - today letting us see how far we've come in seven numbered entries.

Much was shown in the trailer, but what's curious is how Polyphony Digital has chosen a track not available in GT Sport, ruling out a PS4 vs PS5 comparison. There is an overlap in the choice of vehicle though: the Mazda RX Vision GT3 was Kazunori Yamauchi's car of choice, and it is indeed available on GT Sport's dealerships. In theory, most cars could transfer over in a similar manner, with the design of the Mazda making the jump from GT Sport more or less as-is. Much of the internal material-work - chair fabric, the rubberised wheel, LEDs, and even rear-view screen, are matched between the two. Still, GT7's rendering has an advantage: we're getting a native 3840x2160 image from the trailer as opposed to PS4 Pro's checkerboarded 1800p target.

The jump is standout - and ray tracing makes a difference too. An overview of the garage reveals a huge focus on ray traced reflections - rather than simply settling for RT shadows. Chrome materials, and even opaque window surfaces reflect the environment with more nuance than we've ever seen on console. Each vehicle even reflects its own details as we pan around their polished chassis. This is the real deal. The caveat is that these reflected elements run at a lowered resolution of circa-1080p in this trailer. It ends up giving portions of the screen an aliased look, within an overall higher-res picture, with almost checkerboard-esque artefacts. Still, it's a huge leap over the screen-space reflections of Sport - where artefacts could creep in with objects occluding the reflecting material. This is just one example of how PS5 can leverage a form of ray-tracing, while keeping 4K and 60fps, and it really impresses.

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Crash Bandicoot 4 developer insists there's no microtransactions

Eurogamer - Wed, 01/07/2020 - 13:14

Crash Bandicoot 4: It's About Time will not include microtransactions, the game's developer has insisted.

Toys for Bob took to Twitter last night to reassure fans on the issue, following a Microsoft Store listing which suggested in-game purchases would be included.

It's a thorny issue for the Crash franchise, following the post-launch addition of microtransactions to Crash Team Racing.

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Hacked Roblox accounts are spreading Trump propaganda

Eurogamer - Wed, 01/07/2020 - 12:58

It's once again a presidential election year in America - unfortunately - and although campaigns are getting underway in the US, some political slogans have appeared in a particularly unexpected place. Multiple Roblox users have reported their accounts have been hacked and are now being used to send pro-Trump messages to other players.

As reported by BBC News, hackers are changing the affected avatar's clothing and forcing them to don a hat called The Encierro, which resembles the Trump campaign's red "Make America Great Again" cap. Hackers are also switching the player's clothes to either an eagle t-shirt, or a red, white and blue getup. And, once the user has been completely transformed, they can send messages to others on a player's friend list, such as "ask your parents to vote for Trump this year!" and "MAGA2020".

Although it may seem somewhat harmless, there is a more serious side to this: Roblox is a huge gaming and game development platform, with 90 million users logging in monthly as of April last year. Many of these players are under 18, with a core demographic of kids aged 9 to 15 - making it a more serious problem when hackers are supposedly targeting kids with political messages.

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Fortnite dataminers find a hidden location underwater

Eurogamer - Wed, 01/07/2020 - 12:50

Fortnite fans have found a new location hidden under the waters of its latest update.

The Ruins will emerge later this season as water levels around the submerged map slowly recede.

Today brought the first of these incremental changes, though full plans for the island through until the end of this season (currently pegged for late August) have been found in the game's files and posted to reddit.

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Earth's Final Frontier: The Global Race To Map the Entire Ocean Floor

Slashdot - Wed, 01/07/2020 - 12:00
AmiMoJo shares a report from The Guardian: An ambitious project to chart the seabed by 2030 could help countries prepare for tsunamis, protect marine habitats and monitor deep-sea mining. But the challenge is unprecedented. The race officially kicked off in 2017 at the United Nations Ocean Conference in New York City. When it began, around 6% of the ocean was mapped in accurate detail. On June 21, the global initiative -- known formally as the Nippon Foundation-Gebco Seabed 2030 Project -- released its latest edition: it has now mapped one-fifth of the seafloor. Few countries need accurate maps of the seabed more than Japan, an island nation whose future is uniquely intertwined with the ocean's, and it is the Nippon Foundation , a Japanese non-profit organization run on the gambling proceeds of motorboat racing, that is backing Seabed 2030 with $2m every year. [...] But the mapping is a truly global collaboration, public and free to use, divided among four regional centers. The Alfred Wegener Institute in Germany took the Southern Ocean; Stockholm University and the University of New Hampshire cover the North Pacific and Arctic; New Zealand's National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research are responsible for the South and West Pacific Ocean. That leaves the largest swath, the entire Atlantic and Indian Oceans, to the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University -- Ferrini's team. The finished map itself is created by a fifth centre, based in the UK: the British Oceanographic Data Centre in Southampton. It collects the analyzed data from the four centers and compiles it in the General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (Gebco). The data is in the public domain, free to use, adapt and commercially exploit.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Samsung 870 Qvo SSD announced in capacities up to 8TB

Eurogamer - Wed, 01/07/2020 - 11:28

Samsung released its latest 2.5-inch SATA SSD today, the 870 Qvo, which comes in capacities up to 8TB - twice as big as the largest 860 Qvo model released in 2018 and substantially bigger than most desktop hard drives. It's an impressive milestone, even if UK pricing for the largest 8TB model is nearly £800. Still, with game install sizes ballooning out of control - I'm looking at you here, Warzone - a massive new SSD could be just what the doctor ordered.

So how have Samsung produced a 7mm tall SSD that packs in so much storage space? Unlike most of Samsung's drives, the Qvo series uses QLC NAND, meaning it stores four bits per cell instead of two (MLC, used on Pro series drives) or three (TLC, used on Evo series drives). That, combined with vertical stacking of the flash memory modules, allows the Korean chaebol to offer higher capacities than would otherwise be possible for a given price or form factor, which has lead to the existence of that flagship 8TB model.

* signifies data that has yet to be confirmed by Samsung, but was previously rumoured.

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Categories: Video Games

Someone should make a game about: The Phantom Tollbooth

Eurogamer - Wed, 01/07/2020 - 11:00

Who doesn't love a book with a map in the front of it? And here's one of the best. Look at that landscape - The Kingdom of Wisdom! Check it out, the Foothills of Confusion rising from the Sea of Knowledge. The Forest of Sight, the Mountains of Ignorance, and in the distance the Castle in the Air.

This is The Phantom Tollbooth, a book that I suspect will always feel like a bit of a secret, even though it's been made into films and TV shows and has sold over three million copies. It's a children's adventure, written by Norton Juster, who was an academic and an architect and was meant to be writing something else at the time. It was published in 1962 with wonderfully energetic sketches by Jules Feiffer, who was Juster's friend and - do I remember this correctly? - perhaps room-mate.

The Phantom Tollbooth tells the story of Milo, a young boy who, now I'm re-reading as an adult, is clearly suffering from ennui. Everything is boring and disappointing. He comes home one day to find a gift in his room - a tollbooth that he sets up and drives through in his little toy car.

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A spoiler-heavy interview with The Last of Us Part 2 director Neil Druckmann

Eurogamer - Wed, 01/07/2020 - 10:40

SPOILER WARNING: THIS ARTICLE DISCUSSES THE FULL STORYLINE OF THE LAST OF US PART 2, INCLUDING ITS ENDING.

Before The Last of Us Part 2 was released - but after we had finished playing it, and after its plot had leaked online - we had a chance to interview the game's director Neil Druckmann. It was too good an opportunity to discuss the game's full storyline and radical structure with its creative lead to miss. So here is the second, spoiler-heavy part of our chat - and please, only read on if you have already finished the game.

When you get to the second half of the game, it's so sad that you're meeting these people (and these dogs) that you've already killed. And it's like... I was feeling shame. And I was feeling guilt. I'm not used to feeling those things in games. That's an uncomfortable feeling.

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Asteroid Impact, Not Volcanic Activity, Killed the Dinosaurs, Study Finds

Slashdot - Wed, 01/07/2020 - 09:00
Scientists have gone back and forth over exactly what caused a mass extinction event 66 million years ago, which destroyed about 75% of all life on Earth, including all of the large dinosaurs. Some have thought that volcanic activity could be to blame, but one new study shows that a giant asteroid impact was the prime culprit. Space.com reports: In a new study, researchers from Imperial College London, the University of Bristol and University College London have shown that the asteroid impact, not volcanic activity, was the main reason that about 75% of life on Earth perished at that time, and it did so by significantly interfering with Earth's climate and ecosystems. To come to this conclusion, the researchers modeled how Earth's climate would be expected to respond to two separate possible extinction causes: volcanism and asteroid impact. In these mathematical models, they included environmental factors including rainfall and temperature, which would have been critical to the survival of these species. They also included the presence of sunlight-blocking gases and particles and carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas. With these models, the team found that the giant asteroid hitting our planet would have released tremendous amounts of gas and particles into Earth's atmosphere, blocking out the sun for years on end. This effect would have created a sort of semi-permanent winter on Earth, making the planet unlivable for most of its inhabitants. Now, while the team found the asteroid impact to be the major factor in making Earth unlivable for most animals, they also found that volcanic activity could have actually helped life to recover over time, a conclusion that scientists have drawn before. They found that, while volcanoes do release sunlight-blocking gases and particles, which would have helped to block the sun in the short term, they also release large amounts of carbon dioxide which, because it's a greenhouse gas, would have built up in the atmosphere and warmed the planet. So, as the researchers suggest in this work, while the devastating winter caused by the asteroid killed off most life on Earth, over time, the warming effect created from the volcanic greenhouse gases could have helped to restore life to habitats. The study has been published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Dr. Anthony Fauci Says New Virus In China Has Traits of 2009 Swine Flu, 1918 Pandemic Flu

Slashdot - Wed, 01/07/2020 - 05:30
An anonymous reader quotes a report from CNBC: White House coronavirus advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci said Tuesday that U.S. health officials are keeping an eye on a new strain of flu carried by pigs in China that has characteristics of the 2009 H1N1 virus and 1918 pandemic flu. The virus, which scientists are calling "G4 EA H1N1," has not yet been shown to infect humans but it is exhibiting "reassortment capabilities," Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee during a hearing. "In other words, when you get a brand new virus that turns out to be a pandemic virus it's either due to mutations and/or the reassortment or exchanges of genes," he told lawmakers. "And they're seeing virus in swine, in pigs now, that have characteristics of the 2009 H1N1, of the original 1918, which many of our flu viruses have remnants of that in it, as well as segments from other hosts, like swine." Fauci said Tuesday there's always "the possibility that you might have another swine flu-type outbreak as we had in 2009." "It's something that still is in the stage of examination," he said. It's not "an immediate threat where you're seeing infections, but it's something we need to keep our eye on, just the way we did in 2009 with the emergence of the swine flu."

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Declining Eyesight Can Be Improved By Looking At Red Light, Pilot Study Says

Slashdot - Wed, 01/07/2020 - 02:10
swell shares the findings from a small pilot study that suggests a few minutes of looking into a deep red light could have a dramatic effect on preventing eyesight decline as we age. CNN reports: Researchers recruited 12 men and 12 women, whose ages ranged from 28 to 72. Each participant was given a small handheld flashlight that emitted a red light with a wavelength of 670 nanometers. That wavelength is toward the long end of the visible spectrum, and just short of an infrared wavelength, which tends to be invisible to the human eye. They spent three minutes each day looking into the light over a period of two weeks. The lights work on both cones and rods in the eye. Cones are photo receptor cells that detect color and work best in well-lit situations. Rods, which are much more plentiful, are retina cells that specialize in helping us see in dim light, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Researchers measured the cone function in subjects' eyes by having them identify colored letters with low contrast. And they measured their eyes' rod sensitivity by asking them to detect light signals in the dark. There was a 14% improvement in the ability to see colors, or cone color contrast sensitivity, for the entire two dozen participants. Improvement, however, was most significant in study participants over age 40. For those ages, cone color contrast sensitivity rose by 20% over the course of the study. That age bracket also saw significant increases in rod threshold, which corresponds to the ability to see in low light. Study participants under 40 also experienced some improvement, but didn't see the same jump as older subjects. Younger eyes haven't declined as much as older eyes.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Someone Mysteriously Sent Almost $1 Billion In Bitcoin

Slashdot - Wed, 01/07/2020 - 01:30
Someone transferred bitcoins worth close to $1 billion on Tuesday morning, a move that was public for everyone to see while the identities of the sender and receiver remain unknown. Motherboard reports: Big money moves hiding in plain sight tend to be events of some interest among Bitcoiners. Decrypt noted that the sending wallet was recognized as the largest Bitcoin wallet not known to be associated with a business such as an exchange. This means that it could belong to a wealthy private individual, or it could really belong to an exchange, investor, or other business that is simply currently unknown. There's no obligation to publicize which Bitcoin addresses one controls, and if nobody else puts two and two together, one's activities may remain shrouded in pseudonymity. If the Bitcoin wallet belongs to someone legit, then it's likely the transfer was internal to the business, or it represents a large purchase of goods or services, or the sale of bitcoins. Regardless of what it was, the business would be expected to pay taxes in any relevant circumstances. If the transfer wasn't legit, well, pseudonymity and the ability to freely move money without the pre-approval of an authority is the point of Bitcoin. That being said, law enforcement is certainly aware of Bitcoin at this stage in the game and if I'm talking about this transfer then I'm sure more important people could be, too.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

400 TB Storage Drives In Our Future: Fujifilm

Slashdot - Wed, 01/07/2020 - 00:50
One of the two leading manufacturers of tape cartridge storage, FujiFilm, claims that they have a technology roadmap through to 2030 which builds on the current magnetic tape paradigm to enable 400 TB per tape. AnandTech reports: As reported by Chris Mellor of Blocks and Files, Fujifilm points to using Strontium Ferrite grains in order to enable an areal data density on tape of 224 Gbit-per-square-inch, which would enable 400 TB drives. IBM and Sony have already demonstrated 201 Gbit-per-square-inch technology in 2017, with a potential release of the technology for high volume production in 2026. Current drives are over an order of magnitude smaller, at 8 Gbit-per-square-inch, however the delay between research and mass production is quite significant. Strontium Ferrite would replace Barium Ferrite in current LTO cartridges. Strontium sits on a row above Barium in the periodic table, indicating a much smaller atom. This enables for much smaller particles to be placed into tracks, and thankfully according to Fujifilm, Strontium Ferrite exhibits properties along the same lines as Barium Ferrite, but moreso, enabling higher performance while simultaneously increasing particle density. [...] Fujifilm states that 400 TB is the limit of Strontium Ferrite, indicating that new materials would be needed to go beyond. That said, we are talking about only 224 Gbit-per-square-inch for storage, which compared to mechanical hard disks going beyhind 1000 Gbit-per-square-inch today, there would appear to be plenty of room at the top if the technologies could converge.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Nintendo halts sale of digital download codes for its games through European retailers

Eurogamer - Wed, 01/07/2020 - 00:28

Nintendo has announced it will no longer permit European retailers to sell digital download codes for its games starting tomorrow, 1st July, meaning digital sales of its first-party titles for Switch will be restricted exclusively to its own online eShop.

Retailers have had the option to sell digital download codes for first-party Nintendo titles (which would frequently be discounted to prices significantly lower than those offered directly on eShop) alongside physical copies for some time now - but that changes tomorrow.

UK online store ShopTo.net first broke the news to customers yesterday evening, and Nintendo has since confirmed the decision in a statement provided to NintendoLife. The company didn't go into specifics, only saying it had ended digital download code sales for its "own-published software" after "careful examination of the evolving European marketplace in recent years."

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Categories: Video Games

Qualcomm Made a Modern Smartwatch Chip: Meet the Snapdragon Wear 4100

Slashdot - Wed, 01/07/2020 - 00:10
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: After years of repackaging the same basic smartwatch chip over and over again, Qualcomm has graced Wear OS with a modern smartwatch SoC. Meet the Snapdragon Wear 4100, a Qualcomm smartwatch chip that, for the first time ever, is faster than the previous chip. The Wear 4100 uses four 1.7GHz Cortex A53 CPUs built on a 12nm manufacturing process, a major upgrade from the 28nm Cortex A7s that every other Qualcomm smartwatch chip has been up until now. It's not the state-of-the-art 7nm process that Qualcomm's high-end chip uses, and the Cortex A53 is an old CPU design, but for Qualcomm, it's a major upgrade. Between the new CPU, the Adreno 504 GPU, and faster memory, Qualcomm is promising "85% faster performance" compared to the Wear 3100. There are actually two versions of the 4100, the vanilla "4100" and the "4100+." The plus version is specifically for smartwatches with an always-on watch face, and like previous Wear SoCs, comes with an extra low-power SoC (based around a Cortex-M0) to keep the time updated and log sensor data (like step counts). Qualcomm is promising a better display image quality in this low-power mode, with more colors and a smoother display. There are also dual DSPs now, which Qualcomm says are for "optimal workload partitioning, support for dynamic clock and voltage scaling, Qualcomm Sensor Assisted Positioning PDR Wearables 2.0, low power location tracking support, and an enhanced Bluetooth 5.0 architecture." There are also dual ISPs with support for 16MP sensors (on a smartwatch?). As usual, connectivity options are plentiful, with onboard LTE, GPS, NFC, Wi-Fi 802.11n, and Bluetooth 5.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Amazon is yanking struggling free-to-play shooter Crucible back into closed beta

Eurogamer - Tue, 30/06/2020 - 23:37

Amazon has made the unprecedented decision to withdraw its struggling free-to-play team-based shooter Crucible from general release, and it will now, a little over a month after its initial launch, re-enter a period of closed beta testing.

Despite being Amazon's first foray into video games, Crucible released on Steam to remarkably little fanfare back in May, and while it managed to attract decent interest initially, concurrent player numbers have steadily fallen to peaks of less than two hundred players a day.

Amazon and developer Relentless' initial, and rather surprising, response was to retire all but one of Crucible's three modes, leaving only Heart of the Hives intact. "Focusing on one mode allows us to refine the design of core systems without the compromises we needed to make to support three game modes", Relentless explained at the time.

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YouTube TV Jacks Up Pricing To Become Most Expensive Cable TV Alternative

Slashdot - Tue, 30/06/2020 - 23:30
On Tuesday, Google's YouTube TV announced a monthly $15 price hike, bringing its streaming package of channels to $64.99 monthly, from $49.99. "YouTube TV is now the most expensive of the cable TV streaming alternative services," notes USA Today. "When YouTube TV launched in 2017, it was $35." From the report: In a company blog post, YouTube defended its decision by announcing the availability of additional channels from Viacom, including MTV and Nickelodeon. The move is effective Tuesday for new members, while existing subscribers will see their rates rise after July 30. "This new price reflects the rising cost of content and we also believe it reflects the complete value of YouTube TV, from our breadth of content to the features that are changing how we watch live TV," YouTube said. AT&T Now recently lowered pricing to $55 monthly, while Hulu with Live TV is $54.99. Sling TV is the lowest priced of the cable TV alternatives, at $30 monthly for the Orange or Blue packages, or $45 for both. However, Sling doesn't carry all the local broadcast stations in each market, so check your local listings. Philo is even cheaper, at $20 monthly, but is missing news and sports channels. A 2019 study by Consumer Reports found the average cable TV bill is $217.42 monthly.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Android's AirDrop Competitor Is Coming Soon

Slashdot - Tue, 30/06/2020 - 22:50
Android's long-awaited "Nearby Sharing" feature, which allows you to share files between Android devices wirelessly, is rolling out to beta testers. Android Police reports: Nearby Sharing may appear slightly differently depending on the type of content you try to share. In all cases, it shows up as an app in the apps list on the share sheet, but you may also get a smaller prompt just under the content preview, more like it did in the previous Android 11 video leak. We tested it on a Pixel 4 XL and Pixel 3a running Android 10, but the appearance may also vary on other versions of Android. Note that Nearby Share works for both files like photos or videos, as well as other shareable content like Tweets and URLs. It probably works with a lot of things. Select Nearby Share in the share sheet as the target, and you're prompted to turn on the feature, if it's the first time you've used it. The quick setup process lets you configure your default device name and device visibility settings, though those can also be changed later. Once you have it enabled, Nearby Sharing starts looking for other nearby devices. The interface is pretty simple: A big X in the top left corner backs you out, your avatar on the right takes you to a settings pane that lets you configure things like your device name, visibility, and which mechanism to use to make the transfer (i.e., whether to use your internet connection for small files, to stick to Wi-Fi, or to always share offline). Google says Nearby Share is currently in limited testing via the Play Services beta: "We're currently conducting a beta test of a new Nearby Share feature that we plan to share more information on in the future. Our goal is to launch the feature with support for Android 6+ devices as well as other platforms."

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National Mask Mandate Could Save 5 Percent of GDP, Economists Say

Slashdot - Tue, 30/06/2020 - 22:10
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Washington Post: After a late-spring lull, daily coronavirus cases in the United States have again hit record highs, driven by resurgent outbreaks in states such as Florida, Arizona and California. Hospitals in Houston are already on the brink of being overwhelmed, and public health experts worry the pandemic's body count will soon again be climbing in tandem with the daily case load. The dire situation has raised the specter of another round of state-level stay-at-home orders to halt the pandemic's spread and caused a number of governors to pause or reverse their ongoing reopening plans. Against this backdrop, a team of economists at investment bank Goldman Sachs has published an analysis suggesting more painful shutdowns could be averted if the United States implements a nationwide mask mandate. "A face mask mandate could potentially substitute for lockdowns that would otherwise subtract nearly 5% from GDP," the team, led by the company's chief economist, Jan Hatzius, writes. It's worth noting the authors of the report are economists and not public health experts. Their primary motivation is to protect the economic interests of Goldman Sachs's investors, which is why they're interested in the effects of federal policy on gross domestic product. But their findings are in line with a number of other published studies on the efficacy of masks. The Goldman Sachs report notes the United States is a global outlier with respect to face mask use, which is widespread in Asia and currently mandated in many European countries. Though the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention "recommends" the use of masks in public and 20 states plus the District of Columbia have implemented their own mandates, there is no binding national policy, with wide regional variations in mask use around the country. "We estimate that statewide mask mandates gradually raise the percentage of people who 'always' or 'frequently' wear masks by around 25 [percentage points] in the 30+ days after signing," the authors write. "Our numerical estimates are that cumulative cases grow 17.3% per week without a mask mandate but only 7.3% with a mask mandate, and that cumulative fatalities grow 29% per week without a mask mandate but only 16% with a mask mandate."

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Media Molecule's Dreams is getting VR support in July

Eurogamer - Tue, 30/06/2020 - 21:52

Media Molecule's impressively flexible PlayStation 4 creation tool Dreams will finally be getting PSVR support next month, starting on 22nd July.

Dreams' VR support will arrive as part of a free expansion Media Molecule is calling Inside The Box, which will include tutorials, kits, and everything users might potentially need to both create and play Dreams experiences from within VR.

According to a new post on the PlayStation Blog, Inside The Box gets things started with a new introduction called All Aboard VR, designed to walk through Dreams' new VR controls.

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