news

FCC Chairman Wants Public Auction To Repurpose Satellite Bands For 5G

Slashdot - Wed, 20/11/2019 - 04:10
Chairman Ajit Pai is pressing for a public auction of wireless frequencies in the C-band spectrum (the 4GHz to 8GHz range often used by satellite companies) for the sake of 5G service. Engadget reports: This would help the FCC clear up "significant" frequency space in a quick fashion, generate money for the government and "ensure continued delivery" of existing services, Pai argued. He hoped to auction off a 280MHz slice while leaving the upper 200MHz available. An FCC official told the Wall Street Journal that the regulator hoped to bring the C-band auction up for a vote in 2020 and start the auction by the end of that year. Satellite companies, however, might not be so happy. Industry giants like Intelsat and SES haven't been averse to selling their spectrum, but they've wanted a private auction to share the money they make and have claimed the FCC isn't allowed to take in-use spectrum without paying them. A public auction flies in the face of that. The C-Band Alliance, a group representing the satellite firms, has hinted at "protracted litigation" if the FCC pushes forward. Carriers are also of mixed opinions. AT&T, which owns DirecTV, has called C-band an "opportunity" but also wanted compensation and a "reasonable transition plan" to avoid disruptions. Verizon (Engadget's parent company and Pai's former employer) likewise wanted "appropriate incentives and protections" to ensure a quick process.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Valve Announces Half-Life: Alyx, Its First Flagship VR Game

Slashdot - Wed, 20/11/2019 - 03:50
Yesterday, Valve announced Half-Life: Alyx, the first new game in the acclaimed Half-Life series in well over a decade. And unlike the previous Half-Life installments, this game will be playable exclusively in virtual reality. The Verge reports: We don't currently have any details beyond the tweet from Valve above, which appears to be the first tweet from a new, Twitter-verified Valve Software account established in June. But clearly, we'll be learning more on Thursday, presumably from this social media account, at 10am PT. Despite being some of the most influential and critically acclaimed PC games ever made, Valve has famously never finished either of its Half-Life supposed trilogies of games. After Half-Life and Half-Life 2, the company created Half-Life: Episode 1 and Half-Life: Episode 2, but no third game in the series. The closest we've come to knowing anything about where Half-Life was headed was this thinly veiled fanfic from former Valve writer Marc Laidlaw.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Ask Slashdot: What Happened To Holographic Data Storage?

Slashdot - Wed, 20/11/2019 - 03:30
dryriver writes: In an episode of the BBC's Tomorrow's World broadcasted all the way back in 1984, a presenter shows hands-on how a laser hologram of a real-world object can be recorded onto a transparent plastic medium, erased again by heating the plastic with an electric current, and then re-recorded differently. The presenter states that computer scientists are very interested in holograms because the future of digital data storage may lie in them. This was 35 years ago. Holographic data storage for PCs, smartphones, etc. still is not available commercially. Why is this? Are data storage holograms too difficult to create? Or did nobody do enough research on the subject, getting us all stuck with mechanical hard disks and SSDs instead? Where are the hologram drives that appeared "so promising" three decades ago?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Senator Introduces Bill That Would Block US Companies From Storing Data In China

Slashdot - Wed, 20/11/2019 - 02:50
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Hill: Sen. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.) on Monday introduced a bill that would curtail the flow of sensitive information about people in the U.S. to China through large tech companies like Apple and TikTok. Hawley's legislation would place new and wide-reaching limitations on companies with ties to China such as TikTok, the mega-popular social media platform owned by a Chinese firm, and Apple, an American company that builds many of its components in mainland China. The bill, called the National Security and Personal Data Protection Act, would subject a litany of companies with ties to countries of "national security concern," including Russia and China, to a new privacy regime. Sens. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) and Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) also signed onto the bill on Monday. Hawley's bill would apply to tech companies that are subject to Chinese or Russian law, or are under the jurisdiction of those countries in a way that would allow those governments to access user data without "respect for civil liberties and privacy," according to the bill. Those companies would not be allowed to collect private data beyond what is required to run their services or transfer data on U.S. users to countries of concern. They would also be required to store information on U.S. users in the United States itself, and would have to submit a yearly report proving their compliance with the law once a year to the Federal Trade Commission, the U.S. attorney general, and all state attorneys general.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Disney+ Fans Without Answers After Thousands Hacked

Slashdot - Wed, 20/11/2019 - 02:10
Many Disney+ users who have had their accounts stolen and put up for sale on the dark web say that Disney has yet to sort their problems. The firm says it does not believe its systems have been compromised, suggesting that members' details have been stolen by other means. The BBC reports: On November 12, its first day live, people had technical problems and many complained on social media. Others said they were locked out of their accounts, and since they contacted Disney they have not heard back. According to an investigation by ZDNet, thousands of user accounts went on sale on the dark web. Only hours after the service launched, hackers were selling Disney+ accounts for as little as $3. A subscription to the service costs $7 a month. With the help of a cyber-security researcher, the BBC also found several hacked customer accounts for sale on the dark web. Many say they used unique userIDs and passwords to access the streaming platform. But Jason Hill, a lead researcher with CyberInt, says it looks like many were stolen because people use the same passwords for different sites. Mr Hill said that hackers can lift someone's password from a different site which has previously been hacked and then try it on a new site, like Disney+. If it works, they steal the account. The streaming service does not have two-factor authentication. Others are concerned because they can use their Disney+ login to access other products the company provides, like the Disney store and its recreation parks.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Rust is getting 10 new playable instruments in its wholesome first "premium" DLC

Eurogamer - Wed, 20/11/2019 - 01:47

If you're like me, then you'll firmly believe that all games could be vastly improved with the addition of a melodious hooter that you can blast a proper tune out of when spirits are low. And developer Facepunch Studios is clearly on the same page because it's just announced that Rust's first "premium" DLC will add a whole new range of musical instruments.

Rust already has one playable instrument in the form of the acoustic guitar, but the brutal multiplayer survival game's entirely wholesome new paid DLC will introduce an additional 10 - something that fans seem to have been genuinely clamouring for.

In total, Rust's instrument pack will usher in the wheelbarrow piano, junkyard drum kit, the shovel bass, the xylobones, the sousaphone, cowbell, canbourine, jerry can guitar, pan flute, and, finally, the plumber's trumpet. Which is not the delightful euphemism it might initially seem to be. Pictures of each and every one can be found in the official announcement post.

Read more

Categories: Video Games

Google Is Putting An Algorithmic Audio News Feed On Its Assistant

Slashdot - Wed, 20/11/2019 - 01:30
Google is adding an algorithmically determined news feed to its Google Assistant via a new service it's calling "Your News Update." The Verge reports: Google uses the information it has learned about you over the years alongside your location to custom-build a series of short news updates from partners from which it has licensed audio. It hopes to foster an ecosystem it's calling "the audio web," according to Liz Gannes, Google's product manager of audio news. These aren't podcasts so much as news bites, similar to the hourly news updates that can be heard on the radio. Your News Update replaces the current way of getting news updates from Assistant, which consists of a straightforward list of news sources. With that system, you have to choose which sources you want and what order they're played in. Before, you would have had to ask for the news and hear the hourly update from NPR, then The Daily from The New York Times, then CNN (or whichever news sources you chose). Now, you will hear individual, topic-specific news bites from Google's news partners. And instead of it cycling hourly or daily, it will play based on those topics. Google says that once Your News Update goes live, users will be able to choose between either the new system or the original one.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Here's what you'll need to turn your Oculus Quest into a PC VR headset

Eurogamer - Wed, 20/11/2019 - 01:11

Back in September, Facebook announced that it would soon be launching Oculus Link, a new cable-software combo enabling owners of its self-contained, tether-free Oculus Quest headset to enjoy the benefits of PC VR, and the expansive Rift software library. Oculus Link has now entered beta and, to accompany its arrival, Facebook has detailed exactly what interested parties will need to take advantage of the feature.

Assuming you've already got an Oculus Quest (which is somewhat critical for everything else to function), the first thing you'll need to ensure is that your PC meets the minimum specifications for the Oculus Link beta - which, it's worth noting, are a little different to those of the Rift.

You'll need Windows 10, at least 8GB of RAM, an Intel Core i5-4590/AMD Ryzen 5 1500X processor or higher, and one available USB 3.0 port. The real sticking point, however, will likely be your graphics card, with the Oculus Link beta only supporting a very limited number.

Read more

Categories: Video Games

Cops Put GPS Tracker On Man's Car, Charge Him With Theft For Removing It

Slashdot - Wed, 20/11/2019 - 00:50
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: Back in 2012, the US Supreme Court ruled that it's illegal for the police to attach a GPS tracking device to someone's car without a warrant. But what if you find a GPS tracking device on your car? Can you remove it? A little more than a year ago, the state of Indiana charged a suspected drug dealer [Derek Heuring] with theft for removing a government-owned GPS tracking device from his SUV. This month, the state's Supreme Court began considering the case, and some justices seemed skeptical of the government's argument. "I'm really struggling with how is that theft," said Justice Steven David during recent oral arguments. At trial, Heuring's legal team argued that the search had been illegal because the police didn't have probable cause to believe their client had committed theft. The defense pointed out that the device could have fallen off the car by accident or simply malfunctioned. Even if Heuring did take the device off the vehicle, he couldn't have known for sure that it belonged to the government. It wasn't exactly labeled as the property of the Warrick County Sheriff's Office. Most important, it's not clear that taking an unwanted device off your car is theft -- even if you know who it belongs to. With the case now at the state Supreme Court, the stakes are high. If Heuring can show that the police lacked probable cause to search his house, he could get all of the evidence gathered in the search thrown out -- not only evidence of GPS device theft, but evidence of drug dealing, too. In July, an appellate court ruled against Heuring, "leading to the case reaching the Indiana Supreme Court earlier this month," the report says. "Initially, multiple justices seemed skeptical of the idea that taking a tracking device off your own car amounted to theft." "If somebody wants to find me to do harm to me and it's not the police and they put a tracking device on my car and I find a tracking device and I dispose of it after stomping on it 25 times, I would hope they would not be able to go to a local prosecutor and somehow I'm getting charges filed against me for destroying someone else's property," Justice David said.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Senators Ask Zuckerberg To Explain Why Facebook Still Tracks Users' Location Even When They Have Asked it Not To

Slashdot - Wed, 20/11/2019 - 00:10
Two senators are asking Facebook to "respect" users' decisions to keep their location data from the company. From a report: In a letter sent Tuesday, Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., and Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del., asked Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg to respond to questions about how the company collects location data through the new operating systems for Apple's iPhones and Google's Android. Both Google and Apple updated their operating systems earlier this year to give users more control and insight into which apps can access their location data. Anticipating those changes, Facebook released a blog post in September explaining that even if users opt out of letting Facebook collect their data, it could still determine users' locations in other ways, like through check-ins and users' internet connections. "If a user has decided to limit Facebook's access to his or her location, Facebook should respect these privacy choices," the senators, members of the Judiciary Committee, wrote in the letter to Zuckerberg. "The language in the blog post, however, indicates that Facebook may continue to collect location data despite user preferences, even if the user is not engaging with the app, and Facebook is simply deducing the user's location from information about his or her internet connection. Given that most mobile devices are connected to the internet nearly all the time, whether through a cellular network or a Wi-Fi connection, this practice would allow Facebook to collect user location data almost constantly, irrespective of the user's privacy preferences. Users who have selected a restrictive location services option could reasonably be under the misimpression that their selection limits all of Facebook's efforts to extract location information."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

The Flat-Earth Conspiracy Continues To Spread Around the Globe

Slashdot - Tue, 19/11/2019 - 23:30
An anonymous reader shares a report: "I don't want to be a flat Earther," David Weiss says, his voice weary as he reflects on his personal awakening. "Would you wake up in the morning and want everyone to think you're an idiot?" But Weiss is a flat Earther. Ever since he tried and failed to find proof of the Earth's curve four years ago, he's believed with an evident passion that our planet is both flat and stationary -- and it's turned his world upside down. [...] People in every pocket of this spherical planet are rejecting science and spreading the word that the Earth is flat. There's no clear study indicating how many people have been convinced -- and flat Earthers like Weiss will tell you without evidence there are millions more in the closet anyway, including Hollywood A-listers and commercial airline pilots -- but online communities have hundreds of thousands of followers and YouTube is inundated with flat-Earth content creators, whose productions reach millions. A YouGov survey of more than 8,000 American adults suggested last year that as many as one in six Americans are not entirely certain the world is round, while a 2019 Datafolha Institute survey of more than 2,000 Brazilian adults indicated that 7% of people in that country reject that concept, according to local media. The flat-Earth community has its own celebrities, music, merchandise -- and a weighty catalog of pseudo-scientific theories. It's been the subject of a Netflix documentary and has been endorsed by figures including the rapper B.o.B. Each year, more flat-Earth events fill the calendar, organizers say.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

How does Halo Reach on PC improve over Xbox 360?

Eurogamer - Tue, 19/11/2019 - 23:24

It's been a long wait but Halo: The Master Chief Collection is finally coming to PC. At X019 last week, Microsoft confirmed that the planned episodic roll-out of the collection is set to kick off on December 3rd with the arrival of Halo: Reach. We went hands-on with the port at the event, grabbed a bunch of capture and dug deep into the settings menus. We also spotted the intriguing addition of an 'enhanced mode' that uses the extra power of modern hardware to further upgrade the Reach experience beyond resolution and frame-rate alone.

System requirements for Reach are slight to say the least - which is perhaps not surprising when you bear in mind that the original game launched just over nine years ago for Xbox 360. 343 Industries says that an Nvidia GTX 770 (pretty much on par with a GTX 680 or GTX 960) is good enough to deliver 60 frames per second at 4K resolution - and you can get an idea of what that experience looks like by taking a look at the video embedded on this page.

Based on our playtest of the PC game, 343 Industries has stuck to the Master Chief Collection template established by the Xbox One compilation. New assets - if any - are thin on the ground: this is effectively the original Reach, liberated from the 1152x720 resolution of the Xbox 360 game. That's absolutely fine as despite being mastered to last-gen standards, the art design still holds up beautifully today. Performance-wise, the original release had some issues maintaining its 30fps target frame-rate - a situation resolved by the revamped Xbox One back-compat rendition of the game. Obviously though, PC goes much further: at X019, the game ran very smoothly at 60fps and it'll be interesting to see if the port can be unlocked to run faster still.

Read more

Categories: Video Games

Xiaomi Integrates Earthquake Alert System Into MIUI OS

Slashdot - Tue, 19/11/2019 - 22:50
Xiaomi today unveiled a new iteration of its virtual assistant Xiao Ai and shared a new feature of Android-based MIUI operating system as the publicly listed Chinese technology group pushes to expand its internet services ecosystem. From a report: At its annual Mi Developer conference in Beijing, the company said it is integrating an earthquake warning function into MIUI for select users in China, with plans to expand it nationwide soon. The integration, touted as the first of its kind globally, will enable alerts to be sent to smartphones running MIUI 11 and Mi TV "seconds to tens of seconds" before the quake waves arrive, Xiaomi said. The feature, which was first tested in September this year, has been developed in partnership with Institute of Care-life, a Chengdu-based organization focusing on natural disaster warning. Xiaomi said it has activated the feature for the earthquake-prone Sichuan Province and plans to expand it elsewhere in the nation soon. Wang Tun, head of the institute, said this function, unlike those available through apps in some countries, works more efficiently and does not rely on a working internet connection.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Antivirus Vendors and Non-Profits Join To Form 'Coalition Against Stalkerware'

Slashdot - Tue, 19/11/2019 - 22:10
Ten organizations today announced the creation of the Coalition Against Stalkerware, the first global initiative of its kind, with the sole purpose of fighting against stalkerware. From a report: Also known as spouseware, stalkerware is a smaller category of the spyware class. Stalkerware refers to apps that abusive partners install on the devices of their loved ones without their knowledge or consent. They contain features that allow the abuser to track their significant other's geographical location, web browsing habits, social media activity, log keystrokes inside instant messaging apps, retrieve photos, or even record audio and video without the owner's knowledge. Stalkerware apps are available for both mobile and desktop operating systems and are often sold commercially under the guise of child trackers, pet trackers, phone-finding apps, remote access toolkits, and so on. This kind of apps live in a gray area of the current app ecosystem where they can be used for both legitimate and criminal purposes, giving app makers an easy excuse when confronted with abuse reports from victims -- albeit some apps are more blatant and advertise themselves as a way to catch cheating girlfriends, although, these cases are rare.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Fans think recently released PlayStation advert is teasing new Crash Bandicoot game

Eurogamer - Tue, 19/11/2019 - 22:04

Fans of Crash Bandicoot might be in luck. Recently spotted shenanigans in a new PlayStation commercial join a pile of mounting evidence suggesting that a new Crash game is on the way.

The advert in question, titled It's Time to Play, features a procession of high-profile video game mascots interacting with non-video-game humans - with one segment, in a nod to Crash Team Racing, featuring Crash and pals roaring around a car park. Here's where the mystery lies.

It's a bit of a blink-and-you'll-miss-it moment, but as the mostly familiar karting procession closes in on the camera, a second mask can be seen hovering just behind Coco. Floating masks aren't, of course, anything new in Crash, but this particular once has not, as far as fans can make out, been featured in a game before.

Read more

Categories: Video Games

Secretive Energy Startup Backed By Bill Gates Achieves Solar Breakthrough

Slashdot - Tue, 19/11/2019 - 21:10
A secretive startup backed by Bill Gates has achieved a solar breakthrough aimed at saving the planet. From a report: Heliogen, a clean energy company that emerged from stealth mode on Tuesday, said it has discovered a way to use artificial intelligence and a field of mirrors to reflect so much sunlight that it generates extreme heat above 1,000 degrees Celsius. Essentially, Heliogen created a solar oven -- one capable of reaching temperatures that are roughly a quarter of what you'd find on the surface of the sun. The breakthrough means that, for the first time, concentrated solar energy can be used to create the extreme heat required to make cement, steel, glass and other industrial processes. In other words, carbon-free sunlight can replace fossil fuels in a heavy carbon-emitting corner of the economy that has been untouched by the clean energy revolution. "We are rolling out technology that can beat the price of fossil fuels and also not make the CO2 emissions," Bill Gross, Heliogen's founder and CEO, told CNN Business. "And that's really the holy grail."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Google and Samsung Fix Android Spying Flaw. Other Makers May Still Be Vulnerable

Slashdot - Tue, 19/11/2019 - 20:50
Until recently, weaknesses in Android camera apps from Google and Samsung made it possible for rogue apps to record video and audio and take images and then upload them to an attacker-controlled server -- without any permissions to do so. Camera apps from other manufacturers may still be susceptible. From a report: The weakness, which was discovered by researchers from security firm Checkmarx, represented a potential privacy risk to high-value targets, such as those preyed upon by nation-sponsored spies. Google carefully designed its Android operating system to bar apps from accessing cameras and microphones without explicit permission from end users. An investigation published Tuesday showed it was trivial to bypass those restrictions. The investigation found that an app needed no permissions at all to cause the camera to shoot pictures and record video and audio. To upload the images and video -- or any other image and video stored on the phone -- to an attacker-controlled server, an app needed only permission to access storage, which is among one of the most commonly given usage rights. The weakness, which is tracked as CVE-2019-2234, also allowed would-be attackers to track the physical location of the device, assuming GPS data was embedded into images or videos. Google closed the eavesdropping hole in its Pixel line of devices with a camera update that became available in July. Checkmarx said Samsung has also fixed the vulnerability, although it wasn't clear when that happened. Checkmarx said Google has indicated that Android phones from other manufacturers may also be vulnerable. The specific makers and models haven't been disclosed.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

People Are Having Sex With 3D Avatars of Their Exes and Celebrities

Slashdot - Tue, 19/11/2019 - 20:10
samleecole writes: Using a photograph to algorithmically generate a person's face and some 3D-rendered body parts, anyone can make a realistic avatar of someone who is walking around in real life. Import the avatar into another program, and you can have sex with them in virtual reality, without the real person ever giving consent. On forums like Reddit, marketplaces like Patreon, and on standalone websites, communities of anonymous users are making and selling computer-generated likenesses of celebrities and other real people. The 3D models that emerge from these communities can be articulated into any position, animated, modified, interacted with in real time, and manipulated in ways that defy the constraints of physical reality. Like deepfake videos traded online, the technology to create photorealistic 3D models of real people is rapidly approaching -- and it's getting easier for the average user to access those tools and programs. Rendering a realistic human is a process which historically required the specialized technical knowledge of teams of artists in game and special effects studios. Those studios, traditionally, have to obtain the rights to use someone's likeness before rendering them, but many hobbyists seemingly make avatars of anyone, with or without their consent.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Google Stadia Review: Gaming's Streaming Future Isn't Here Yet

Slashdot - Tue, 19/11/2019 - 19:30
Scott Stein, reviews Google Stadia cloud gaming service for CNET: Stadia's launch day was earlier this week... sort of. Really, consider this the start of Stadia's early-access beta period. Because Google's big promises haven't arrived, and at the price of the Stadia's Founder's Edition, I can't recommend anyone jump onboard at the moment. Google's experimental game streaming service, Stadia, launches without many of its promised features, and just a handful of games. It works, but there's not much incentive to buy in. We've heard about the promises of streaming games over the internet for a decade. Stadia really does work as a way to stream games. I've only played a couple of the 12 games Google promised by Tuesday's launch, though. That short list pales compared to what Microsoft already has on tap for its in-beta game-streaming service, xCloud. It's no match for what Nvidia's game streaming GeForce Now already has or what PlayStation Now offers. Prices of Stadia games at launch in the US are below. They're basically full retail game prices. This could get crazy expensive fast. [...] Stadia has so few games right now, and I'm trying them with no one else online. It isn't clear how things will work now that the service is going live, and what other features will kick in before year's end. I'm curious, but I might lose interest. Others might, too. I have plenty of other great games to play right now: on Apple Arcade, VR and consoles such as the Switch. Stadia isn't delivering new games yet, it's just trying to deliver a new way to play through streaming. One that you can already get from other providers. Until Google finds a way to loop in YouTube and develop truly unique competitive large-scale games, Stadia isn't worth your time yet. Yes, the future is possibly wild, and you can see hints of the streaming-only cloud-based playground Stadia wants to become. But we'll see what it shapes into over the next handful of months and check back in. Raymond Wong, writing for Input Mag looks at the amount of data playing a game on Stadia consumes and how the current state of things require a very fast internet connection to work: Like streaming video, streaming games is entirely dependent on your internet speed. Faster internet delivers smooth, lag-free visuals, and slower internet means seeing some glitches and dropped framerates. Google recommends a minimum of connection of 10Mbps for 1080p Full HD streaming at 30 fps with stereo sound and 35Mbps for 4K resolution streaming (in HDR if display is supported) at 60 fps with 5.1 surround sound. Reality didn't reflect Google's advertising, though. Despite having a Wi-Fi connection with 16-20Mbps downloads in a hotel room in LA, streaming Shadow of the Tomb Raider and Destiny 2 to my 13-inch MacBook Pro wasn't 100% stable. The visuals would glitch out for a second or two about every 10 minutes of playtime. [...] A fast internet connection isn't the only thing you need for Stadia to work right. You need a lot of bandwidth, too. One hour of playing Red Dead Redemption 2 at 1080p resolution on my 46-inch HDTV via a Chromecast Ultra ate up 5.3GB of data. This seemed insane until I saw an hour of Destiny 2 on a Pixel 3a XL with 6-inch, 1080p-resolution display gobbled up 9.3GB of data!

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

The Outer Worlds' latest patch fixes font size issues, foliage envy, and more

Eurogamer - Tue, 19/11/2019 - 19:25

If you've been enjoying your time with Obsdian's satirical space RPG The Outer Worlds, but have grown weary of squinting against the cold glass of your TV screen in order to decipher its teeny-tiny text, then rejoice: today you may finally slump back in your chair. The Outer Worlds' latest patch is out now and introduces, among other things, font size options for the game.

According to Obsidian's handy patch notes for The Outer Worlds' 1.1.1.0 update, a font size option has been one of the community's top requested features since launch, and players on all platforms can now embiggen the fonts used in conversation text, cinematic subtitles, bark subtitles, and terminal text. You'll find the option in the Settings menu's UI tab.

For the most part, update 1.1's remaining changes are focussed on bug fixing and balancing - certain crashes should no longer happen, muffled sound should be a thing of the past on PS4, problematic companion quests and achievements should now be working as intended, and the Prismatic Hammer will no longer do thousand of points of damage at higher levels.

Read more

Categories: Video Games
Syndicate content