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SpaceX Asserts 5G Would 'Blow Out' Satellite Users In 12 GHz Band

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2022 - 02:10
Monica Alleven writes via Fierce Wireless: So much for the "win-win-win" scenario that Dish Network envisioned for the 12 GHz band. Dish and fellow MVDDS licensee RS Access have argued that the 12 GHz band can be used by both satellite players like SpaceX's Starlink and by companies like Dish that want to use it for 5G, all for the public's benefit. SpaceX on Tuesday submitted its own analysis (PDF) of the effect of terrestrial mobile deployment on non-geostationary orbit fixed satellite service (NGSO FSS) downlink operations. The upshot: The SpaceX study shows terrestrial mobile service would cause harmful interference to SpaceX's Starlink terminals in the 12.2-12.7 GHz band more than 77% of the time, resulting in full outages 74% of the time. Although entities like RS Access note that SpaceX has access to plenty of other spectrum to accomplish its broadband mission, SpaceX insists that the 12 GHz band has become one of the most important and intensely used spectrum bands for Americans who depend on satellite services. In fact, SpaceX said it depends on the 12 GHz band for the workhorse frequencies in critical downlink services to serve Americans "in every corner of the nation." [...] SpaceX would like the FCC to drop the 12 GHz proceeding, but Dish and RS Access have been urging the FCC for years to change the rules so that their MVDDS licenses can be used for two-way 5G services. In response to SpaceX's submission, the 5G for 12 GHz Coalition, issued the following statement: "We understand that SpaceX has -- after 18 months and both a robust comment and reply period -- just filed its own in-house technical submission to the 12 GHz proceeding. Our engineers and technical experts are reviewing the filing in depth and remain committed to working in good faith with the FCC and stakeholders to ensure that the American public is able to reap the immense benefits of 5G services in this band."

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Coinbase Shares Fall After Rival Binance.US Drops Spot Bitcoin Trading Fees

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2022 - 01:30
Coinbase shares fell almost 10% on Wednesday after rival crypto exchange Binance.US said it's dropping certain trading fees for customers. CNBC reports: Binance.US, the U.S. affiliate of the largest crypto exchange in the world by trading volume, said it will allow users to make spot bitcoin trades for the U.S. dollar and stablecoins tether, USD Coin and Binance USD without paying spot trading fees. Shares of Coinbase were down 9.7%. Robinhood slipped by less than 1%. In a separate report, Barron's Daren Fonda speculates that a price war could be next. "It's the beginning of the end of Coinbase's high-fee business model," says Mizuho Securities analyst Dan Dolev. "We've said that the fees will eventually go close to zero. And it could be pretty rapid -- it may be months. The market is very competitive and getting tighter."

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Alexa Will Soon Be Able To Read Stories As Your Dead Grandma

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2022 - 00:50
An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechCrunch: At its annual re:Mars conference today in Las Vegas, Amazon's Senior Vice President and Head Scientist for Alexa, Rohit Prasad, announced a spate of new and upcoming features for the company's smart assistant. The most head turning of the bunch was a potential new feature that can synthesize short audio clips into longer speech. In the scenario presented at the event, the voice of a deceased loved one (a grandmother, in this case), is used to read a grandson a bedtime story. Prasad notes that, using the new technology, the company is able to accomplish some very impressive audio output, using just one minute of speech. Details are scant, at the moment. There's no timeline or further specifics, but -- at very least -- this is the kind of news that will likely invite all manner of scrutiny over potential applications beyond something as banal or even heartwarming as reading a child The Wizard of Oz.

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CBDCs, Not Crypto, Will Be Cornerstone of Future Monetary System, BIS Says

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2022 - 00:10
Crypto's structural flaws make it an unsuitable basis for a monetary system, according to the Bank for International settlements (BIS). Instead, monetary systems could be built around central bank digital currencies (CBDCs), which are digital representations of central bank money. CoinDesk reports: The BIS, an association of the world's major central banks, dedicates a 42-page chapter in its "2022 Annual Economic Report" to laying out a blueprint for the future of the global monetary system. In that vision, there is room for only some of crypto's underlying technical features, like programmability and tokenization, not for cryptocurrencies themselves. "Our broad conclusion is captured in the motto, "Anything that crypto can do, CBDCs can do better,'" said Hyun Song Shin, an economic adviser and head of research at the BIS, during a press briefing on Monday. The chapter, which will be published Tuesday ahead of the full report, identifies a number of limitations of crypto, including the lack of a stable nominal anchor. In monetary policy that is a variable -- such as a currency peg -- that can be used to control price levels. Stablecoins, cryptocurrencies pegged to the value of assets like sovereign currencies, are the crypto world's search for such an anchor, Shin said. Stablecoins attempt to "piggyback on the stability of real money issued by central banks." Shin said the recent crash of terraUSD, a dollar stablecoin with a market capitalization of $18 billion in early May that rapidly lost its peg, illustrated how stablecoins, despite their name, are unstable and don't make good units of account. Unlike other leading stablecoins, such as USDC and USDT, which are reportedly backed by dollar-denominated reserves, terraUSD is an algorithmic stablecoin backed by another cryptocurrency (in this case LUNA) with an algorithm in place to regulate supply and demand of the stablecoin and maintain its peg. "The second important finding is that crypto and stablecoins fail to achieve the full network effects that we normally expect of money," Shin said. Money, Shin said, is the perfect example of a virtuous circle of greater use and greater acceptance. Crypto's decentralized nature, on the other hand, achieves exactly the opposite, namely fragmentation.

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Mullvad VPN Axes Recurring Subscriptions In the Name of Privacy

Slashdot - Wed, 22/06/2022 - 23:30
Mullvad has taken the decision to completely remove the ability to create new subscriptions -- all in the name of storing less data about their users. TechRadar reports: "Subscriptions clearly offer a lot of convenience but as we've seen that convenience comes at a cost and we no longer think this is an acceptable trade-off. We care deeply about usability but when it comes down to it, privacy has to win," wrote the provider in a blog post. This move is a step forward in Mullvad's commitment to its users' privacy. It's actually one of the few services not to ask for any email address or other personal information to create an account. However, when it came to recurring subscription, the provider was forced to retain record of payments in order to provide refunds, charge the user again after their initial period of cover or recover a missing account. Therefore, one-time payments appear to be the only solution. "We are constantly looking for ways to reduce the amount of data we store while still providing a usable service. Nowhere is the tension between privacy and usability more apparent than in the area of payments." Mullvad's monthly fee has always been the same on every plan - around $5.50. This is very different than almost every other consumer VPN, but there's no need to stress about a price rise. What's more, those who currently have an active Mullvad subscription do not need to worry either. Their account will keep running as usual for at least six months, or until their subscription comes to the end of a term.

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Court Rules DMCA Does Not Override First Amendment's Anonymous Speech Protections

Slashdot - Wed, 22/06/2022 - 22:50
An anonymous reader quotes a report from the Electronic Frontier Foundation: Copyright law cannot be used as a shortcut around the First Amendment's strong protections for anonymous internet users, a federal trial court ruled on Tuesday. The decision by a judge in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California confirms that copyright holders issuing subpoenas under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act must still meet the Constitution's test before identifying anonymous speakers. The case is an effort to unmask an anonymous Twitter user (@CallMeMoneyBags) who posted photos and content that implied a private equity billionaire named Brian Sheth was romantically involved with the woman who appeared in the photographs. Bayside Advisory LLC holds the copyright on those images, and used the DMCA to demand that Twitter take down the photos, which it did. Bayside also sent Twitter a DMCA subpoena to identify the user. Twitter refused and asked a federal magistrate judge to quash Bayside's subpoena. The magistrate ruled late last year that Twitter must disclose the identity of the user because the user failed to show up in court to argue that they were engaged in fair use when they tweeted Bayside's photos. When Twitter asked a district court judge to overrule the magistrate's decision, EFF and the ACLU Foundation of Northern California filed an amicus brief in the case, arguing that the magistrate's ruling sidestepped the First Amendment when it focused solely on whether the user's tweets constituted fair use of the copyrighted works. [...] EFF is pleased with the district court's decision, which ensures that DMCA subpoenas cannot be used as a loophole to the First Amendment's protections. The reality is that copyright law is often misused to silence lawful speech or retaliate against speakers. For example, in 2019 EFF successfully represented an anonymous Reddit user that the Watchtower Bible and Tract Society sought to unmask via a DMCA subpoena, claiming that they posted Watchtower's copyrighted material. We are also grateful that Twitter stood up for its user's First Amendment rights in court.

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Scientists Hacked a Locust's Brain To Sniff Out Human Cancer

Slashdot - Wed, 22/06/2022 - 22:08
Cyborg locust brains can help spot the telltale signs of human cancer in the lab, a new study has shown. The team behind the work hopes it could one day lead to an insect-based breath test that could be used in cancer screening, or inspire an artificial version that works in much the same way. From a report: Other animals have been taught to spot signs that humans are sick. For example, dogs can be trained to detect when their owners' blood sugar levels start to drop, or if they develop cancer, tuberculosis, or even covid. In all cases, the animals are thought to be sensing chemicals that people emit through body odor or breath. The mix of chemicals can vary depending on a person's metabolism, which is thought to change when we get sick. But dogs are expensive to train and look after. And making a device that mimics a dog's nose has proved extremely difficult to do, says Debajit Saha, one of the scientists behind the latest work, which has not yet been peer-reviewed. "These changes are almost in parts per trillion," says Saha, a neural engineer at Michigan State University. This makes them hard to pick up even with state-of-the-art technologies, he adds. But animals have evolved to interpret such subtle changes in scents. So he and his colleagues decided to "hijack" an animal brain instead.

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Russia Launched Cyber Espionage Campaigns Against Ukraine Allies, Microsoft Says

Slashdot - Wed, 22/06/2022 - 21:31
Russia has levied dozens of cyber espionage campaigns in 42 countries since it invaded Ukraine in February, according to a new Microsoft report. From a report: The report says those efforts have targeted entities across six continents and primarily focused on NATO allies and groups supporting Ukraine. "The Russian invasion relies in part on a cyber strategy that includes at least three distinct and sometimes coordinated efforts -- destructive cyberattacks within Ukraine, network penetration and espionage outside Ukraine and cyber influence operations targeting people around the world," Microsoft President Brad Smith said in the report. The tech giant previously detailed Russian cyber operations against Ukraine itself during the invasion in April. Sixty-three percent of the observed Russian activity in the 42 countries beyond Ukraine targeted NATO members, according to the new report. The United States has been Russia's top target, but the company also noted a large amount of activity in Poland -- which borders Ukraine and has provided significant military and humanitarian assistance to the country -- as well as the Baltic states.

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Brave Search Passes 2.5 Billion Queries in Its First Year

Slashdot - Wed, 22/06/2022 - 20:45
Brave blog: One year ago, we launched Brave Search to give everyone online a real choice over Big Tech: a privacy-protecting, unbiased alternative to Google and Bing, and a truly independent alternative to providers -- such as DuckDuckGo or Startpage -- that rely on Big Tech to run. Today, Brave Search is exiting its beta phase. [...] Brave Search has grown faster than any search provider since Bing. Some numbers: 2.5 billion queries in the past 365 days, a high of 14.1 million queries per day, 5 billion queries annualized (projection based on current monthly totals).

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Colombia's New President Gustavo Petro Pledges To Keep Fossil Fuels in the Ground

Slashdot - Wed, 22/06/2022 - 20:01
Colombia has elected its first left-wing president, setting the Latin American nation on a path to wind down its fossil fuel production. From a report: Leftist Gustavo Petro was voted in Sunday night alongside Goldman prize-winning environmental campaigner Francia Marquez, the nation's first black and second female vice-president. In his manifesto, Petro committed to "undertake a gradual de-escalation of economic dependence on oil and coal." He committed not to grant any new licenses for hydrocarbon exploration during his four-year mandate and to halt all pilot fracking projects and the development of offshore fossil fuels. "These are not baby steps but huge steps towards the transition and reducing fossil fuels," said Colombian environmentalist Martin Ramirez. If Petro formalises his commitments to phasedown fossil fuel production, Colombia could become the largest fossil fuel producer to do so. At the Cop26 climate talks in Glasgow last year, Costa Rica and Denmark launched an alliance of countries committed to phasing out oil and gas production known as the Beyond Oil and Gas Alliance, collectively accounting for 0.2% of global oil production. Colombia produces around 1% of the world's coal, oil and gas.

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Wimbledon Hoping Big Data Will Improve Fan Experience

Slashdot - Wed, 22/06/2022 - 19:21
Wimbledon is turning to big data to help improve fans' tennis knowledge, after discovering even ticket holders at the Championships were not aware of most of the players in the game. From a report: Crowds at this year's tournament -- expected to return to sold-out levels with easing of coronavirus restrictions -- are to be exposed to more facts and figures organisers hope will help get them "closer to the sport." AI-powered stats will seek to better explain the strengths and weaknesses in players' games but also predict upsets and rising stars, with data built in part from trawling newspaper headlines. Alexandra Willis, the All England Club's director of communications and marketing, said the idea had come about before Covid. "We found that most fans didn't watch tennis the rest of the year," she said. "They also hadn't heard of most of the players [and] this was a specific barrier to engagement." Spectators at Wimbledon fortnight, as well as television viewers and app users, will have access to Win Factor, a tool that will aggregate data from a number of sources to better predict a player's chances of victory in a given match. Fans will be able to input their own match predictions while being encouraged to scour more information on some of the game's lesser-known players.

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Saltier Oceans Could Have Prevented Earth From Freezing

Slashdot - Wed, 22/06/2022 - 18:41
The Sun shone 20% less brightly on early Earth, and yet fossil evidence shows that our planet had warm shallow seas where stromatolites -- microbial mats -- thrived. Now a study may have solved the "faint young Sun paradox," showing that saltier oceans could have prevented Earth from freezing over during Archean times, 3bn years ago. From a report: We all know that the composition of the atmosphere (particularly the abundance of greenhouse gases) plays a crucial role in tempering Earth's climate, but what about the composition of the oceans? To answer this question researchers used an ocean-atmosphere general circulation model to investigate the impact of salinity. They show that saltier oceans result in warmer climates, partly because the salt depresses the freezing point of seawater and inhibits sea-ice formation, but mostly because the greater density of salty water alters ocean circulation patterns and aids heat transport to the poles. Under their Archean scenario they show that present-day levels of salinity produce a severely glaciated world with only a narrow strip of open water at the equator. But pushing salinity up to 40% greater than today revealed a warmer Archean world, with average surface temperatures of more than 20C, and ice only appearing seasonally at the poles. Their findings are reported in Geophysical Research Letters.

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China Approves Plan for 'Healthy' Development of Fintech Sector

Slashdot - Wed, 22/06/2022 - 18:00
Chinese President Xi Jinping chaired a meeting Wednesday that approved promoting the "healthy" development of the payment and fintech sectors, a sign that a broad crackdown on tech companies like Ant Group may be easing. From a report: The meeting of the central commission for deepening overall reform also backed enhancing regulation of major payment platforms, state broadcaster China Central Television reported, adding that companies would be encouraged to return to their roots while the authorities will improve regulation. As part of the plans, China would ensure the security of payment and financial infrastructure, and work to prevent and defuse systemic financial risks, CCTV said. The government will also enhance oversight of financial holding companies and financial institutions invested by platform firms, the report said, without adding details.

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Canada To Compel YouTube, TikTok and Streamers To Boost Domestic Content

Slashdot - Wed, 22/06/2022 - 17:22
Canada approved legislation that targets what video- and audio-sharing platforms like YouTube and TikTok can broadcast to a Canadian audience, as the country follows in Europe's footsteps in imposing a heftier regulatory burden on the digital sector. From a report: This marks the second attempt in as many years by Canada's Liberal government to compel digital platforms, including streaming companies like Netflix, to prominently feature Canadian artists on their services when users with a Canadian internet-protocol address log in. As contemplated under the new measures, users who search for music, television programming, films or do-it-yourself video shorts would get results incorporating a certain quota of Canadian-made content. YouTube, a unit of Alphabet, TikTok, and the big streaming companies, among them Netflix, as well as legal experts and some Canadian artists, have either opposed Canada's move or warned of unintended consequences -- such as hurting the people the new policy is intended to help. Countries like Canada are increasingly turning to regulatory changes to protect domestic interests in light of the big inroads the world's biggest digital companies have made in transforming how households watch programs, listen to music, conduct day-to-day business and consume news.

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Blockchains Vulnerable To Tampering, a DARPA Analysis Finds

Slashdot - Wed, 22/06/2022 - 16:40
A new report finds that blockchain systems might not be working as well as many crypto enthusiasts assume. From a report: The report was commissioned by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, and the work was done by the software security research company Trail of Bits. Trail of Bits CEO Dan Guido says blockchain -- the public ledgers that keep track of cryptocurrencies, which are replicated on computers around the world -- isn't the egalitarian tech its advocates claim. "It's been taken for granted that the blockchain is immutable and decentralized, because the community says so," says Guido. But in practice, he says, these networks have evolved in ways that concentrate power in the hands of certain people or companies, including the large pools of "miners" whose computers earn virtual currency by maintaining the blockchains. Guido's team calls these potential situations "unintended centralities" -- situations in which someone gains leverage over the decentralized system, creating opportunities for tampering with the record of who owns what. Another example in the report of this kind of concentration is the fact that 60% of Bitcoin traffic is handled by just three internet service providers. "Let's say somebody with great top-down control of the internet in their country starts to interfere with that network," Guido says. By slowing down or stopping legitimate blockchain traffic, an attacker could become the "majority" voice in the consensus of what's written to a blockchain at that moment. "They can rewrite history. They can censor transactions. They can make it so that you can't spend your Bitcoin," says Guido. "It's definitely something people would want to do if they want to 'grief' the network."

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Half in UK Back Genome Editing To Prevent Severe Diseases

Slashdot - Wed, 22/06/2022 - 16:00
More than half the UK backs the idea of rewriting the DNA of human embryos to prevent severe or life-threatening diseases, according to a survey. From a report: Commissioned by the Progress Educational Trust (PET), a fertility and genomics charity, the Ipsos poll found that 53% of people support the use of human genome editing to prevent children from developing serious conditions such as cystic fibrosis. There was less enthusiasm for use of the procedure to prevent milder conditions such as asthma, with only 36% in favour, and to create designer babies, with only a fifth expressing support, but views on the technology differed dramatically with age. Younger generations were far more in favour of designer babies than older people, with 38% of 16- to 24-year-olds and 31% of 25- to 34-year-olds supporting the use of gene editing to allow parents to choose features such as their child's height and eye and hair colour. In the UK and many other countries it is illegal to perform genome editing on embryos that are intended for pregnancies, but the restrictions could be lifted if research shows the procedure can safely prevent severe diseases. Genome editing has been hailed as a potential gamechanger for dealing with a raft of heritable diseases ranging from cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy to Tay-Sachs, a rare condition that progressively destroys the nervous system. In principle, the faulty genes that cause the diseases can be rewritten in IVF embryos, allowing those embryos to develop into healthy babies.

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Mega Says It Can't Decrypt Your Files. New POC Exploit Shows Otherwise

Slashdot - Wed, 22/06/2022 - 15:00
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: In the decade since larger-than-life character Kim Dotcom founded Mega, the cloud storage service has amassed 250 million registered users and stores a whopping 120 billion files that take up more than 1,000 petabytes of storage. A key selling point that has helped fuel the growth is an extraordinary promise that no top-tier Mega competitors make: Not even Mega can decrypt the data it stores. On the company's homepage, for instance, Mega displays an image that compares its offerings to Dropbox and Google Drive. In addition to noting Mega's lower prices, the comparison emphasizes that Mega offers end-to-end encryption, whereas the other two do not. Over the years, the company has repeatedly reminded the world of this supposed distinction, which is perhaps best summarized in this blog post. In it, the company claims, "As long as you ensure that your password is sufficiently strong and unique, no one will ever be able to access your data on MEGA. Even in the exceptionally improbable event MEGA's entire infrastructure is seized!" (emphasis added). Third-party reviewers have been all too happy to agree and to cite the Mega claim when recommending the service. Research published on Tuesday shows there's no truth to the claim that Mega, or an entity with control over Mega's infrastructure, is unable to access data stored on the service. The authors say that the architecture Mega uses to encrypt files is riddled with fundamental cryptography flaws that make it trivial for anyone with control of the platform to perform a full key recovery attack on users once they have logged in a sufficient number of times. With that, the malicious party can decipher stored files or even upload incriminating or otherwise malicious files to an account; these files look indistinguishable from genuinely uploaded data. After receiving the researchers' report privately in March, Mega on Tuesday began rolling out an update that makes it harder to perform the attacks. But the researchers warn that the patch provides only an "ad hoc" means for thwarting their key-recovery attack and does not fix the key reuse issue, lack of integrity checks, and other systemic problems they identified. With the researchers' precise key-recovery attack no longer possible, the other exploits described in the research are no longer possible, either, but the lack of a comprehensive fix is a source of concern for them. "This means that if the preconditions for the other attacks are fulfilled in some different way, they can still be exploited," the researchers wrote in an email. "Hence we do not endorse this patch, but the system will no longer be vulnerable to the exact chain of attacks that we proposed." Mega has published an advisory here. However, the chairman of the service says that he has no plans to revise promises that the company cannot access customer data.

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Israel Ministry of Defense To Test Drone-Packing Advanced Robotic Tank

Slashdot - Wed, 22/06/2022 - 12:00
The Israeli Ministry of Defense plans to begin testing of a Medium Robotic Combat Vehicle (M-RCV) next year. New Atlas reports: Developed by the Ministry of Defense's Directorate of Defense Research and Development (DDR&D), the Tank and APC Directorate, and Israeli security industries, the robotic tank is based on a new robotic platform type BLR-2 made by Israeli firm BL. It features a 30-mm autonomous turret originally developed by the Tank and APC Directorate for the Eitan armored personnel carrier; the Elbit Iron Fist Active Protection System, which is a smaller, mountable version of the Iron Dome anti-projectile defense system; fire control and mission management systems; a robotic autonomous operations kit; and active and passive sensors for situational awareness. In addition, the robotic vehicle carries a capsuled drone that it can deploy and retrieve for forward reconnaissance missions. It can also carry a variety of heavy loads, as well as an Israeli Aerospace Industries missile launcher and Rafael Advanced Defense Systems Spike missiles. According to Elbit, the robot can operate in all weathers in a largely autonomous mode and can integrate with uncrewed battlefield arrays. Field tests in representative scenarios are scheduled to start in 2023. You can view the M-RCV in action here.

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NASA Starts Shutting Down Voyager After 50 Years

Slashdot - Wed, 22/06/2022 - 09:00
Nasa has begun turning off the spacecraft Voyager's systems, signaling the beginning of the end of the probe's 50-year career. The Independent reports: Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 -- two identical probes -- were launched in 1977 and travelled across interstellar space to the edge of the solar system, giving humanity its closest look at the moons of Jupiter and Saturn. Now, however, Nasa must start limiting the Voyagers' processes in order to keep them operating until 2030. "We're at 44 and a half years," says Ralph McNutt, a physicist at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, told Scientific American. "So we've done 10 times the warranty on the darn things." The first Voyager craft has four remaining functioning instruments, while Voyager 2 has five, all of which are powered by converting decaying plutonium into electricity. This battery has had its output decreasing by approximately four watts every year, leading to Nasa making some tough choices about what to disable; in 2019, engineers had to turn off the heater for the cosmic-ray detector, a key piece of equipment for detecting when Voyager 2 exited the heliosphere- the magnetosphere, astrosphere and outermost atmospheric layer of the Sun. The final instruments Nasa will disable are likely to be the magnetometer and the plasma science instrument, which are contained in the body of the spacecraft. These are warmed by the excess heat of the computers, while the others are suspended on a 13 meter fiberglass boom, meaning that they are likely to take the longest to get cold. Both craft remain so far from Earth that it takes a radio signal almost 22 hours to reach Voyager 1 and just over 18 for Voyager 2 -- even when traveling at the speed of light.

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FAA: Airlines Must Retrofit Faulty Altimeters 'As Soon As Possible'

Slashdot - Wed, 22/06/2022 - 05:30
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: The Federal Aviation Administration says it finally has a plan for the industry to replace or retrofit airplane altimeters that can't filter out transmissions from outside their allotted frequencies. The altimeter problem has prevented AT&T and Verizon from fully deploying 5G on the C-Band spectrum licenses the wireless carriers purchased for a combined $69 billion. The FAA was urging airlines to retrofit or replace altimeters in recent months and now says it has finalized a plan. An FAA statement on Friday said that "airlines and other operators of aircraft equipped with the affected radio altimeters must install filters or other enhancements as soon as possible." AT&T and Verizon said they will be able to accelerate 5G deployments near airports in the coming months, but the carriers agreed to continue some level of "voluntary mitigations" in the airport areas until July 2023. Altimeters are used by airplanes to measure altitude. The FAA said a new "phased approach requires operators of regional aircraft with radio altimeters most susceptible to interference to retrofit them with radio frequency filters by the end of 2022. This work has already begun and will continue on an expedited basis." Additionally, "filters and replacement units for the mainline commercial fleet should be available on a schedule that would permit the work to be largely completed by July 2023," the FAA said, continuing: "The radio-altimeter manufacturers have worked at an unprecedented pace with Embraer, Boeing, Airbus and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries to develop and test filters and installation kits for these aircraft. Customers are receiving the first kits now. In most cases, the kits can be installed in a few hours at airline maintenance facilities. Throughout this process, the FAA will work with both industries to track the pace of the radio altimeter retrofits while also working with the wireless companies to relax mitigations around key airports in carefully considered phases."

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