news

Netflix Confirms Plans For Ad-Supported Service, Begins Second Round of Layoffs

Slashdot - 23 hours 18 min ago
According to the Wall Street Journal, Comcast's NBCUniversal subsidiary and Google are the "top contenders" for Netflix's upcoming ad-supported streaming tier. "After many years of resisting ads, Netflix CEO Reed Hastings announced the plan for an ad-supported tier in April," reports Ars Technica. "Netflix's stock price dropped 35 percent the day of that announcement, and Netflix revenue growth has been slowing amid a loss in subscribers." From the report: A deal with NBCUniversal would likely mean that "Comcast's video ad unit, FreeWheel, would supply technology to help serve up ads, while NBCUniversal's ad-sales team would help sell ads in the US and Europe," the report said. The Alphabet-owned Google, of course, has plenty of experience serving ads, including on its own YouTube and YouTube TV video platforms. Netflix already uses Google's ad-buying tools. A deal with either NBCUniversal or Google would likely be exclusive, the WSJ report said. Comcast/NBCUniversal and Google aren't the only contenders, as "Roku has also had early talks with Netflix about ad partnerships," the report said. The Information reported last week that Netflix executives recently "met with representatives of both Roku and Comcast to discuss arrangements under which those companies would handle either the ad sales or the technical infrastructure for Netflix's forthcoming ad-supported tier of service." Netflix "is looking to start doing some pre-roll ads, which run before a show starts, in the fourth quarter," The Information report said. Netflix is also negotiating with entertainment companies to put ads into shows that Netflix doesn't create itself. Licensing TV shows and movies for both ad-free and ad-supported streaming will cost Netflix about 20 percent more than for ad-free streaming alone, The Information report said. Variety has confirmed the streamer is "letting go of roughly 300 staffers [...] across multiple business functions in the company, with the bulk of the jobs lost in the U.S." Netflix also laid off 150 employees, and dozens of contractors and part-time workers in May. "Today we sadly let go of around 300 employees," a Netflix spokesperson told Variety. "While we continue to invest significantly in the business, we made these adjustments so that our costs are growing in line with our slower revenue growth. We are so grateful for everything they have done for Netflix and are working hard to support them through this difficult transition."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Italy's Data Watchdog Latest To Warn Over Use of Google Analytics

Slashdot - 23 hours 58 min ago
An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechCrunch: Another strike against use of Google Analytics in Europe: The Italian data protection authority has found a local web publisher's use of the popular analytics tool to be non-compliant with EU data protection rules owing to user data being transferred to the U.S. -- a country that lacks an equivalent legal framework to protect the info from being accessed by US spooks. The Garante found the web publisher's use of Google Analytics resulted in the collection of many types of user data, including device IP address, browser information, OS, screen resolution, language selection, plus the date and time of the site visit, which were transferred to the U.S. without adequate supplementary measures being applied to raise the level of protection to the necessary EU legal standard. Protections applied by Google were not sufficient to address the risk, it added, echoing the conclusion of several other EU DPAs who have also found use of Google Analytics violates the bloc's data protection rules over the data export issue. Italy's DPA has given the publisher in question (a company called Caffeina Media Srl) 90 days to fix the compliance violation. But the decision has wider significance as it has also warned other local websites that are using Google Analytics to take note and check their own compliance, writing in a press release [translated from Italian with machine translation]: "[T]he Authority draws the attention of all Italian managers of websites, public and private, to the illegality of transfers made to the United States through GA [Google Analytics], also in consideration of the numerous reports and questions that are being received by the Office, and invites all data controllers to verify the compliance of the methods of use of cookies and other tracking tools used on its websites, with particular attention to Google Analytics and other similar services, with the legislation on the protection of personal data." A Google spokesperson issued the following statement: "People want the websites they visit to be well designed, easy to use, and respectful of their privacy. Google Analytics helps publishers understand how well their sites and apps are working for their visitors -- but not by identifying individuals or tracking them across the web. These organizations, not Google, control what data is collected with these tools, and how it is used. Google helps by providing a range of safeguards, controls and resources for compliance." Google is reviewing the Italian DPA's decision, according to the spokesperson.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

New White House Partnership Aims To Speed Construction of Offshore Wind Farms

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2022 - 23:22
The White House and 11 governors from East Coast states forged a new partnership on Thursday to build up domestic supply chains for offshore wind farms and related infrastructure. From a report: The new Federal-State Offshore Wind Implementation Partnership includes governors from Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island. As part of the announcement, the Biden administration committed to the facilitation of "timely and effective permitting and environmental reviews" for offshore wind projects and lease sales. In the past, permitting has been a significant bottleneck for advancing offshore wind projects. Crucially, President Joe Biden also moved to ease another major bottleneck: securing the specialized ships needed to erect turbines as tall as skyscrapers in the open ocean. Projects compete for time with the few installation vessels available worldwide, which number just over 30. The US faces additional restrictions because of the Jones Act, which stipulates that ships moving between two points in the US need to be built, owned, crewed, and registered in the US.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

CoinFLEX Pauses Withdrawals Amid 'Extreme Market Conditions' and Counterparty Uncertainty

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2022 - 23:20
Physical futures crypto exchange CoinFLEX is pausing withdrawals citing "extreme market conditions" along with uncertainty around a certain counterparty, its CEO Mark Lamb said in a blog post Thursday. CoinDesk reports: Lamb said the counterparty is not Three Arrows Capital or "any lending firm." CoinFLEX expects to resume withdrawals "in a better position as soon as possible." Additionally, FLEX Coin trading is being halted for perpetual swaps and spot trading in the short term.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Scientists Unveil Bionic Robo-fish To Remove Microplastics From Seas

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2022 - 22:42
Scientists have designed a tiny robot-fish that is programmed to remove microplastics from seas and oceans by swimming around and adsorbing them on its soft, flexible, self-healing body. From a report: Microplastics are the billions of tiny plastic particles which fragment from the bigger plastic things used every day such as water bottles, car tyres and synthetic T-shirts. They are one of the 21st century's biggest environmental problems because once they are dispersed into the environment through the breakdown of larger plastics they are very hard to get rid of, making their way into drinking water, produce, and food, harming the environment and animal and human health. "It is of great significance to develop a robot to accurately collect and sample detrimental microplastic pollutants from the aquatic environment," said Yuyan Wang, a researcher at the Polymer Research Institute of Sichuan University and one of the lead authors on the study. Her team's novel invention is described in a research paper in the journal Nano Letters. "To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of such soft robots." Researchers at Sichuan University have revealed an innovative solution to track down these pollutants when it comes to water contamination: designing a tiny self-propelled robo-fish that can swim around, latch on to free-floating microplastics, and fix itself if it gets cut or damaged while on its expedition.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

PCI Express 7.0 Standard Provides Eight Times the Bandwidth of Today's Connections

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2022 - 22:01
The group responsible for developing and updating the PCI Express standard, the PCI-SIG, aims to update that standard roughly every three years. From a report: Version 6.0 was released earlier this year, and the group has announced that PCIe version 7.0 is currently on track to be finalized sometime in 2025. Like all new PCI Express versions, its goal is to double the available bandwidth of its predecessor, which in PCIe 7.0's case means that a single PCIe 7.0 lane will be able to transmit at speeds of up to 32GB per second. That's a doubling of the 16GB per second promised by PCIe 6.0, but it's even more striking when compared to PCIe 4.0, the version of the standard used in high-end GPUs and SSDs today. A single PCIe 4.0 lane provides bandwidth of about 4GB per second, and you need eight of those lanes to offer the same speeds as a single PCIe 7.0 lane. Increasing speeds opens the door to ever-faster GPUs and storage devices, but bandwidth gains this large would also make it possible to do the same amount of work with fewer PCIe lanes. Today's SSDs normally use four lanes of PCIe bandwidth, and GPUs normally use 16 lanes. You could use the same number of lanes to support more SSDs and GPUs while still providing big increases in bandwidth compared to today's accessories, something that could be especially useful in servers.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Intel Just Asked the EU For $624 Million To Pay It Back For Overturned Anti-AMD Fine

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2022 - 21:21
Intel is seeking to be paid interest of $624 million on the overturned $1.1 billion fine it received from the European Commission back in 2009. From a report: The antitrust ruling was overturned at the beginning of the year, and so Intel has gone to EU General Court seeking compensation and interest on the fine. In fact, Intel is claiming back almost half of that original fine, based on the European Central Bank's refinancing rates. In case you need a reminder on all of this: Intel allegedly took part in anti-competitive practices that saw it offer conditional rebates to key OEMs such as Dell, HP, and Lenovo, making it difficult for competitors (read AMD, or ARM if you prefer, but really AMD) to compete with their own CPUs. The European Commission concluded in 2009 that Intel had indeed behaved in such a way between October 2002 and December 2007 and hit it with one of the largest ever fines at the time at a cool $1.1 billion. Intel appealed the decision unsuccessfully in 2012, but in 2014 it brought the case to the European Court of Justice, which sent it back to the General Court in 2017. The case has been going back and fourth ever since.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Amazon Launches CodeWhisperer, a GitHub Copilot-like AI Pair Programming Tool

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2022 - 20:40
At its re:Mars conference, Amazon today announced the launch of CodeWhisperer, an AI pair programming tool similar to GitHub's Copilot that can autocomplete entire functions based on only a comment or a few keystrokes. From a report: The company trained the system, which currently supports Java, JavaScript and Python, on billions of lines of publicly available open-source code and its own codebase, as well as publicly available documentation and code on public forums. It's now available in preview as part of the AWS IDE Toolkit, which means developers can immediately use it right inside their preferred IDEs, including Visual Studio Code, IntelliJ IDEA, PyCharm, WebStorm and Amazon's own AWS Cloud 9. Support for the AWS Lambda Console is also coming soon. Ahead of today's announcement, Vasi Philomin, Amazon's VP in charge of its AI services, stressed that the company didn't simply create this in order to offer a copy of Copilot. He noted that with CodeGuru, its AI code reviewer and performance profiler, and DevOps Guru, its tool for finding operation issues, the company laid the groundwork for today's launch quite a few years ago.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Is Google Dying? Or Did the Web Grow Up?

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2022 - 20:00
Google is still useful for many, but the harder question is why its results feel more sterile than they did five years ago. From a report: SEO expert Marie Haynes's theory is that this is the result of Google trying to crack down on misinformation and low-quality content -- especially around consequential search topics. In 2017, the company started talking publicly about a Search initiative called EAT, which stands for "expertise, authoritativeness, and trustworthiness." The company has rolled out numerous quality rater guidelines, which help judge content to determine authenticity. One such effort, titled Your Money or Your Life, applies rigorous standards to any pages that show up when users search for medical or financial information. "Take crypto," Haynes explained. "It's an area with a lot of fraud, so unless a site has a big presence around the web and Google gets the sense they're known for expertise on that topic, it'll be difficult to get them to rank." What this means, though, is that Google's results on any topic deemed sensitive enough will likely be from established sources. Medical queries are far more likely to return WebMD or Mayo Clinic pages, instead of personal testimonials. This, Haynes said, is especially challenging for people looking for homeopathic or alternative-medicine remedies. There's a strange irony to all of this. For years, researchers, technologists, politicians, and journalists have agonized and cautioned against the wildness of the internet and its penchant for amplifying conspiracy theories, divisive subject matter, and flat-out false information. Many people, myself included, have argued for platforms to surface quality, authoritative information above all else, even at the expense of profit. And it's possible that Google has, in some sense, listened (albeit after far too much inaction) and, maybe, partly succeeded in showing higher-quality results in a number of contentious categories. But instead of ushering in an era of perfect information, the changes might be behind the complainers' sense that Google Search has stopped delivering interesting results.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Broadcom's $69 Billion VMware Deal Set For Lengthy EU Antitrust Investigation

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2022 - 19:22
Broadcom's $69bn acquisition of cloud software company VMware is set for a lengthy antitrust investigation in Brussels over regulatory concerns that the deal will harm competition across the global technology industry. From a report: Broadcom is already in preliminary discussions with EU officials who will be looking into worries that the merger may lead to abusive behaviour, including potential future price rises by the US chipmaker, three people with direct knowledge of the transaction said. Many large acquisitions receive similar interrogation, known in EU circles as a "phase 1" investigation, which typically takes a few months to complete. But those close to the situation suggest that EU authorities plan to push forward with a more detailed "phase 2" investigation, which could take well over a year and may ultimately derail the deal altogether. Nvidia eventually walked away from a proposed $66bn purchase of chip designer Arm after being subject to a lengthy EU antitrust probe.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Google is Notifying Android Users Targeted By Hermit Government-Grade Spyware

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2022 - 18:42
Security researchers at Lookout recently tied a previously unattributed Android mobile spyware, dubbed Hermit, to Italian software house RCS Lab. Now, Google threat researchers have confirmed much of Lookout's findings, and are notifying Android users whose devices were compromised by the spyware. From a report: Hermit is a commercial spyware known to be used by governments, with victims in Kazakhstan and Italy, according to Lookout and Google. Lookout says it's also seen the spyware deployed in northern Syria. The spyware uses various modules, which it downloads from its command and control servers as they are needed, to collect call logs, record ambient audio, redirect phone calls and collect photos, messages, emails, and the device's precise location from a victim's device. Lookout said in its analysis that Hermit, which works on all Android versions, also tries to root an infected Android device, granting the spyware even deeper access to the victim's data. Lookout said that targeted victims are sent a malicious link by text message and tricked into downloading and installing the malicious app -- which masquerades as a legitimate branded telco or messaging app -- from outside of the app store.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Security Flaws in Internet-Connected Hot Tubs Exposed Owners' Personal Data

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2022 - 18:01
A security researcher found vulnerabilities in Jacuzzi's SmartTub interface that allowed access to the personal data of every hot tub owner. From a report: Jacuzzi's SmartTub feature, like most Internet of Things (IoT) systems, lets users connect to their hot tub remotely via a companion Android or iPhone app. Marketed as a "personal hot tub assistant," users can make use of the app to control water temperature, switch on and off jets, and change the lights. But as documented by hacker Eaton Zveare, this functionality could also be abused by threat actors to access the personal information of hot tub owners worldwide, including their names and email addresses. It's unclear how many users are potentially impacted, but the SmartTub app has been downloaded more than 10,000 times on Google Play. "The main concern is their name and email being leaked," Zveare told TechCrunch, adding that attackers could also potentially heat up someone else's hot tub or change the filtration cycles. "That would make things unpleasant the next time the person checked their tub," he said. "But I don't think there is anything truly dangerous that could have been done -- you have to do all chemicals by hand." Eaton first noticed a problem when he tried to log in using the SmartTub web interface, which uses third-party identity provider Auth0, and found that the login page returned an "unauthorized" error. But for the briefest moment Zveare saw the full admin panel populated with user data flash on his screen.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

FDA Denies Authorization To Market JUUL Products

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2022 - 17:25
Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued marketing denial orders (MDOs) to JUUL Labs for all of their products currently marketed in the United States. From a report: As a result, the company must stop selling and distributing these products. In addition, those currently on the U.S. market must be removed, or risk enforcement action. The products include the JUUL device and four types of JUULpods: Virginia tobacco flavored pods at nicotine concentrations of 5.0% and 3.0% and menthol flavored pods at nicotine concentrations of 5.0% and 3.0%. Retailers should contact JUUL with any questions about products in their inventory. "Today's action is further progress on the FDA's commitment to ensuring that all e-cigarette and electronic nicotine delivery system products currently being marketed to consumers meet our public health standards," said FDA Commissioner Robert M. Califf, M.D. "The agency has dedicated significant resources to review products from the companies that account for most of the U.S. market. We recognize these make up a significant part of the available products and many have played a disproportionate role in the rise in youth vaping." Further reading: Biden Administration Targets Removal of Most Nicotine From Cigarettes.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Extreme Weather Hits China With Massive Floods and Scorching Heat

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2022 - 16:42
China is grappling with extreme weather emergencies across the country, with the worst flooding in decades submerging houses and cars in the south and record-high heat waves in the northern and central provinces causing roads to buckle. From a report: Water levels in more than a hundred rivers across the country have surged beyond flood warning levels, according to the People's Daily, the ruling Communist Party's mouthpiece. The authorities in Guangdong Province on Tuesday raised alerts to the highest level after days of rainfall and floods, closing schools, businesses and public transport in affected areas. The flooding has disrupted the lives of almost half a million people in southern China. Footage on state media showed rescue crews on boats paddling across waterlogged roads to relieve trapped residents. In Shaoguan, a manufacturing hub, factories were ordered to halt production, as water levels have reached a 50-year high, state television reported. Guangdong's emergency management department said that the rainfall has affected 479,600 people, ruined nearly 30 hectares of crops and caused the collapse of more than 1,700 houses, with financial losses totaling $261 million, the official Xinhua News Agency reported.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Linus Torvalds Says Rust For The Kernel Could Possibly Be Merged For Linux 5.20

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2022 - 16:00
Speaking this week at the Linux Foundation's Open-Source Summit, Linus Torvalds talked up the possibilities of Rust within the Linux kernel and that it could be landing quite soon -- possibly even for the next kernel cycle. From a report: Linus Torvalds and Dirk Hohndel had their usual Open-Source Summit keynote/chat where Linus commented on Rust programming language code within the kernel. Torvalds commented that real soon they expect to have the Rust infrastructure merged within the kernel, possibly even for the next release -- meaning Linux 5.20. There hasn't yet been any Rust for Linux pull request sent in or merged yet, but things have begun settling down in the initial Rust enablement code for the kernel with the basic infrastructure, a few basic sample drivers, etc. Last month saw the most recent Rust Linux kernel patches posted that got more functionality into shape and additional reviews completed. As noted plenty of times before, this Rust support within the Linux kernel will remain optional when building the kernel depending upon whether you want the support or any of the kernel features to be implemented just in Rust code.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Twitter Testing Notes, a Long-Form Content Feature

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2022 - 15:00
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Search Engine Land: Twitter is testing a new feature that would eliminate the constraints of its 280-character tweet limit and allow users to publish long-form tweets. Twitter confirmed the test via a tweet. When this will become available to all Twitter users? It's unclear. Twitter noted: "We're excited for the moment when everyone can use Notes, but for now, our focus is on building it right. A large part of that is engaging with writers and building community." For now, Twitter plans to test it over the next two months with a small group of writers from Canada, Ghana, the UK and the U.S. In Twitter Notes, it looks like you will be able to add: - Formatting: Bold, italic and strikethrough text; insert ordered/unordered lists; add links. - Media: You can add one GIF, one video, or up to four images. - Tweets: You can either embed tweets by pasting URLs or from bookmarked tweets. Notes also has a "Focus mode," that makes the article composer full-screen.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

eBay Now Has An Established NFT Marketplace At Its Bidding

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2022 - 12:00
eBay made its biggest move yet into the world of digital collectibles with news today of the company acquiring NFT marketplace KnownOrigin. The online auction company is keeping lips sealed on the deal's value but confirmed in the press release that the deal is closed as of June 21st. The Verge reports: "This partnership will help us attract a new wave of NFT creators and collectors," said KnownOrigin co-founder David Moore. KnownOrigin describes itself as "one the world's first, and largest, NFT Marketplaces," and it currently ranks No. 12 on all-time trading volume for Ethereum-backed NFTs at $7.8 million, according to DappRadar. Higher ranked, more popular marketplaces include OpenSea (No. 1) with an all-time trading value at $30.43 billion and Decentraland (No. 8) at $155.66 million. eBay started allowing NFT sales on its site last year. With the KnownOrigin acquisition, eBay has the opportunity to control a proper digital marketplace where NFT transactions can be both monitored and controlled -- not just offered with the fingers-crossed hope the seller transfers an NFT to the buyer's wallet correctly.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

NASA Taps Three Companies To Design Nuclear Power Plants For the Moon

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2022 - 09:00
NASA announced on Tuesday that it's contracting three suppliers to provide concept designs for nuclear fission energy systems designed for use on the moon. TechCrunch reports: The winning bids for this award came from Lockheed Martin, Westinghouse and IX (a joint venture from Intuitive Machines and X-Energy). Each will be working with a few partners to develop their systems, which will be "initial concepts" only for the purposes of satisfying this particular contract, and each will receive roughly $5 million for their work, expected to take around 12 months. NASA is aptly partnering with the Department of Energy (DOE) on this project, and the specs include a 40-kilowatt power generation capability, capable of generating that for at least a decade. That's about what a full charge on a current entry-level Nissan Leaf contains -- but as a fission generator it would obviously provide that continuously. It may not seem like much, but deployed singularly or in groups to support a lunar base, it could solve a lot of the challenges of the kind of prolonged occupancy of the moon that NASA plans to eventually establish through its Artemis program, which seeks to return humans to our largest natural satellite for ongoing science missions. NASA also notes that the work done for this contract could have other future applications for propulsion systems for long-range spacecraft for deep space explorations.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Half In UK Back Genome Editing To Prevent Severe Diseases

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2022 - 05:30
An anonymous reader quotes a report from the Guardian: More than half the UK backs the idea of rewriting the DNA of human embryos to prevent severe or life-threatening diseases, according to a survey. Commissioned by the Progress Educational Trust (PET), a fertility and genomics charity, the Ipsos poll found that 53% of people support the use of human genome editing to prevent children from developing serious conditions such as cystic fibrosis. There was less enthusiasm for use of the procedure to prevent milder conditions such as asthma, with only 36% in favor, and to create designer babies, with only a fifth expressing support, but views on the technology differed dramatically with age. Younger generations were far more in favor of designer babies than older people, with 38% of 16- to 24-year-olds and 31% of 25- to 34-year-olds supporting the use of gene editing to allow parents to choose features such as their child's height and eye and hair color. In the UK and many other countries it is illegal to perform genome editing on embryos that are intended for pregnancies, but the restrictions could be lifted if research shows the procedure can safely prevent severe diseases.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Juul E-Cigarettes To Be Ordered Off US Shelves

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2022 - 02:50
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is preparing to order Juul Labs Inc to take its e-cigarettes off the market in the United States, the Wall Street Journal reported on Wednesday, citing people familiar with the matter. Reuters reports: Juul has faced heightened scrutiny from regulators, lawmakers and state attorneys general over the appeal of its nicotine products to teenagers. Under pressure, the company in late 2019 had halted U.S. sales of several flavors. "This clearly comes as a surprise to the market ... we would expect that Juul would appeal the decision, and remain on the market through that process, which would likely take a year or more," Cowen analyst Vivien Azer said. The looming verdict comes nearly two years after Juul had applied for approval to keep selling e-cigarettes in the country. The FDA's review of the applications was based on whether the e-cigarettes are effective in getting smokers to quit and, if so, whether the benefits to smokers outweigh the health damage to new users, including teenagers. [...] The estimated fair value of Altria's investment in Juul was $1.6 billion as of March end, a fraction of the $12.8 billion it paid in 2018, as a crackdown on vaping has upended the once fast-growing industry.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff
Syndicate content